An examination of the dynamic relationship between self-efficacy and performance across levels of analysis and levels of specificity

Yeo, GB and Neal, A (2006) An examination of the dynamic relationship between self-efficacy and performance across levels of analysis and levels of specificity. Journal of Applied Psychology, 91 5: 1088-1101.

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Author Yeo, GB
Neal, A
Title An examination of the dynamic relationship between self-efficacy and performance across levels of analysis and levels of specificity
Journal name Journal of Applied Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9010
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/0021-9010.91.5.1088
Volume 91
Issue 5
Start page 1088
End page 1101
Total pages 14
Editor S. Zedeck
Place of publication Washington, D. C., U. S. A.
Publisher Amer Psychological Assoc/Educational Publishing Foundation
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
380108 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
780108 Behavioural and cognitive sciences
740000 - Education and Training
1799 Other Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract This research used resource allocation theory to generate predictions regarding dynamic relationships between self-efficacy and task performance from 2 levels of analysis and specificity. Participants were given multiple trials of practice on an air traffic control task. Measures of task-specific self-efficacy and performance were taken at repeated intervals. The authors used multilevel analysis to demonstrate differential and dynamic effects. As predicted, task-specific self-efficacy was negatively associated with task performance at the within-person level. On the other hand, average levels of task-specific self-efficacy were positively related to performance at the between-persons level and mediated the effect of general self-efficacy. The key findings from this research relate to dynamic effects - these results show that self-efficacy effects can change over time, but it depends on the level of analysis and specificity at which self-efficacy is conceptualized. These novel findings emphasize the importance of conceptualizing self-efficacy within a multilevel and multispecificity framework and make a significant contribution to understanding the way this construct relates to task performance.
Keyword Self-efficacy
General Self-efficacy
Task Performance
Multilevel Analyses
Dynamic Relationships
Psychology, Applied
Individual-differences
Skill Acquisition
Job-satisfaction
Goal Orientation
Human Agency
Work
Behavior
Time
Consequences
Determinants
Q-Index Code C1

 
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