An examination of learning processes during critical incident training: Implications for the development of adaptable trainees

Neal, A. F., Godley, S. T., Kirkpatrick, T., Dewsnap, G., Joung, W. and Hesketh, B. (2006) An examination of learning processes during critical incident training: Implications for the development of adaptable trainees. Journal of Applied Psychology, 91 6: 1276-1291.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Neal, A. F.
Godley, S. T.
Kirkpatrick, T.
Dewsnap, G.
Joung, W.
Hesketh, B.
Title An examination of learning processes during critical incident training: Implications for the development of adaptable trainees
Journal name Journal of Applied Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9010
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/0021-9010.91.6.1276
Volume 91
Issue 6
Start page 1276
End page 1291
Total pages 16
Editor S. Zedeck
Place of publication Washington
Publisher Amer Psychological Assoc/Educational Publishing Foundation
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
380108 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
749901 Occupational training
170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
Abstract Three experiments are reported that examined the process by which trainees learn decision-making skills during a critical incident training program. Formal theories of category learning were used to identify two processes that may be responsible for the acquisition of decision-making skills: rule learning and exemplar learning. Experiments I and 2 used the process dissociation procedure (L. L. Jacoby, 1998) to evaluate the contribution of these processes to performance. The results suggest that trainees used a mixture of rule and exemplar learning. Furthermore, these learning processes were influenced by different aspects of training structure and design. The goal of Experiment 3 was to develop training techniques that enable trainees to use a rule adaptively. Trainees were tested on cases that represented exceptions to the rule. Unexpectedly, the results suggest that providing general instruction regarding the kinds of conditions in which a decision rule does not apply caused them to fixate on the specific conditions mentioned and impaired their ability to identify other conditions in which the rule might not apply. The theoretical, methodological, and practical implications of the results are discussed.
Keyword Training
Decision Making
Examples
Rules
Learning
Fire Fighting
Psychology, Applied
Adaptive Performance
Knowledge Structures
Goal Orientation
Categorization
Memory
Exemplar
Rule
Models
Classification
Metaanalysis
Q-Index Code C1

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 147 Abstract Views, 5 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 08:24:38 EST