Habitat selection and breeding success in a forest-nesting Alcid, the marbled murrelet, in two landscapes with different degrees of forest fragmentation

Zharikov, Yuri, Lank, David B., Huettmann, Falk, Bradley, Russell W., Parker, Nadine, Yen, Peggy P. -W., Mcfarlane-Tranquilla, Laura A. and Cooke, Fred (2006) Habitat selection and breeding success in a forest-nesting Alcid, the marbled murrelet, in two landscapes with different degrees of forest fragmentation. Landscape Ecology, 21 1: 107-120. doi:10.1007/s10980-005-1438-5


Author Zharikov, Yuri
Lank, David B.
Huettmann, Falk
Bradley, Russell W.
Parker, Nadine
Yen, Peggy P. -W.
Mcfarlane-Tranquilla, Laura A.
Cooke, Fred
Title Habitat selection and breeding success in a forest-nesting Alcid, the marbled murrelet, in two landscapes with different degrees of forest fragmentation
Journal name Landscape Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0921-2973
1572-9761
Publication date 2006-01
Year available 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10980-005-1438-5
Volume 21
Issue 1
Start page 107
End page 120
Total pages 14
Place of publication Dordrecht
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
270704 Landscape Ecology
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract We studied habitat selection and breeding success in marked populations of a protected seabird (family Alcidae), the marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus), in a relatively intact and a heavily logged old-growth forest landscape in south-western Canada. Murrelets used old-growth fragments either proportionately to their size frequency distribution (intact) or they tended to nest in disproportionately smaller fragments (logged). Multiple regression modelling showed that murrelet distribution could be explained by proximity of nests to landscape features producing biotic and abiotic edge effects. Streams, steeper slopes and lower elevations were selected in both landscapes, probably due to good nesting habitat conditions and easier access to nest sites. In the logged landscape, the murrelets nested closer to recent clearcuts than would be expected. Proximity to the ocean was favoured in the intact area. The models of habitat selection had satisfactory discriminatory ability in both landscapes. Breeding success (probability of nest survival to the middle of the chick rearing period), inferred from nest attendance patterns by radio-tagged parents, was modelled in the logged landscape. Survivorship was greater in areas with recent clearcuts and lower in areas with much regrowth, i.e. it was positively correlated with recent habitat fragmentation. We conclude that marbled murrelets can successfully breed in old-growth forests fragmented by logging.
Keyword Conservation
Edge Effect
Euclidean Distance
Gis
Landscape Ecology
Old-growth Forest
Radio-telemetry
Ecology
Geography, Physical
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
British-columbia
Population
Patterns
Oregon
Growth
Island
Associations
Vegetation
Behavior
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2007 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 08:22:00 EST