A new approach to assessing the health benefit from obesity interventions in children and adolescents: the assessing cost-effectiveness in obesity project

Haby, M. M., Vos, T., Carter, R., Moodie, M., Markwick, A., Magnus, A., Tay-Teo, K.- S. and Swinburn, B. (2006) A new approach to assessing the health benefit from obesity interventions in children and adolescents: the assessing cost-effectiveness in obesity project. International Journal of Obesity, 30 10: 1463-1475.


Author Haby, M. M.
Vos, T.
Carter, R.
Moodie, M.
Markwick, A.
Magnus, A.
Tay-Teo, K.- S.
Swinburn, B.
Title A new approach to assessing the health benefit from obesity interventions in children and adolescents: the assessing cost-effectiveness in obesity project
Journal name International Journal of Obesity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0307-0565
Publication date 2006-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/sj.ijo.0803469
Volume 30
Issue 10
Start page 1463
End page 1475
Total pages 13
Editor R. L. Atkinson
I. Macdonald
Place of publication London
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
321019 Paediatrics
730306 Evaluation of health outcomes
Formatted abstract Objective: To report on a new modelling approach developed for the assessing cost-effectiveness in obesity (ACE-Obesity) project and the likely population health benefit and strength of evidence for 13 potential obesity prevention interventions in children and adolescents in Australia.

Methods:
We used the best available evidence, including evidence from non-traditional epidemiological study designs, to determine the health benefits as body mass index (BMI) units saved and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) saved. We developed new methods to model the impact of behaviours on BMI post-intervention where this was not measured and the impacts on DALYs over the child's lifetime (on the assumption that changes in BMI were maintained into adulthood). A working group of stakeholders provided input into decisions on the selection of interventions, the assumptions for modelling and the strength of the evidence.

Results: The likely health benefit varied considerably, as did the strength of the evidence from which that health benefit was calculated. The greatest health benefit is likely to be achieved by the 'Reduction of TV advertising of high fat and/or high sugar foods and drinks to children', 'Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding' and the 'multi-faceted school-based programme with an active physical education component' interventions.

Conclusions:
The use of consistent methods and common health outcome measures enables valid comparison of the potential impact of interventions, but comparisons must take into account the strength of the evidence used. Other considerations, including cost-effectiveness and acceptability to stakeholders, will be presented in future ACE-Obesity papers. Information gaps identified include the need for new and more effective initiatives for the prevention of overweight and obesity and for better evaluations of public health interventions.
Keyword Obesity Prevention
Children & Adolescents
Modelling Health Benefit
Effectiveness
Endocrinology & Metabolism
Nutrition & Dietetics
Randomized Controlled-trial
Childhood Obesity
Energy Density
Mental-health
Body-weight
Prevention
Program
Consumption
Australia
Education
Q-Index Code C1

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 66 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 82 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 139 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 08:19:48 EST