An Australian Idol of Modernist Consumerism: Minnie Tittell Brune and the Gallery Girls

Kelly, Veronica (2006) An Australian Idol of Modernist Consumerism: Minnie Tittell Brune and the Gallery Girls. Theatre Research International, 31 1: 17-36.

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Author Kelly, Veronica
Title An Australian Idol of Modernist Consumerism: Minnie Tittell Brune and the Gallery Girls
Journal name Theatre Research International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0307-8833
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0307883305001859
Volume 31
Issue 1
Start page 17
End page 36
Total pages 20
Editor C. Balme
F. Rokern
Place of publication UK
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
410102 Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies
750202 The creative arts
Abstract The Australian career of the young American actor Minnie Tittell Brune exemplifies the complex cultural and economic forces operating on the institution of live theatre at the beginning of the twentieth century. Brune focalizes the contemporary processes which reconstituted the international institution of mass entertainment out of the traditional cultural practices of theatre. The theatrical star is seen as both engaging with and resisting the commodification of her labour power; image and talent resulting from her ambiguous industrial role as magnetic 'star' and as managerial commodity. However, the iconic and affective power of the actor evokes strong attachment from significant sections of the newly heterosocial popular audience, in particular from the gallery girls, the young female audience who idolized Brune as a performative personality enacting social self-realization and glamorous transformation. Through reading Brume's repertoire, her social persona as 'star' and her 'emotional' performative style, it is demonstrated how artistic retro-glamour, religious evangelicalism and discourses of sexuality and femininity serve to manage theatre's move into the mass-entertainment age.
Keyword Theatre
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 08:17:07 EST