Analysis of the acute postoperative pain experience following oral surgery: identification of 'unaffected', 'disabled' and 'depressed, anxious and disabled' patient clusters

Vickers, E. R., Boocock, H., Harris, R. D., Bradshaw, J., Cooper, M., Vickers, P. and Cannon, P. (2006) Analysis of the acute postoperative pain experience following oral surgery: identification of 'unaffected', 'disabled' and 'depressed, anxious and disabled' patient clusters. Australian Dental Journal, 51 1: 69-77. doi:10.1111/j.1834-7819.2006.tb00404.x


Author Vickers, E. R.
Boocock, H.
Harris, R. D.
Bradshaw, J.
Cooper, M.
Vickers, P.
Cannon, P.
Title Analysis of the acute postoperative pain experience following oral surgery: identification of 'unaffected', 'disabled' and 'depressed, anxious and disabled' patient clusters
Journal name Australian Dental Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0045-0451
Publication date 2006-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1834-7819.2006.tb00404.x
Volume 51
Issue 1
Start page 69
End page 77
Total pages 9
Editor P.M. Bartold
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Australian Dental Association
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
320899 Dentistry not elsewhere classified
730112 Oro-dental and disorders
Abstract Background: Pain is defined as both a sensory and an emotional experience. Acute postoperative tooth extraction pain is assessed and treated as a physiological (sensory) pain while chronic pain is a biopsychosocial problem. The purpose of this study was to assess whether psychological and social changes Occur in the acute pain state. Methods: A biopsychosocial pain questionnaire was completed by 438 subjects (165 males, 273 females) with acute postoperative pain at 24 hours following the surgical extraction of teeth and compared with 273 subjects (78 males, 195 females) with chronic orofacial pain. Statistical methods used a k-means cluster analysis. Results: Three clusters were identified in the acute pain group: 'unaffected', 'disabled' and 'depressed, anxious and disabled'. Psychosocial effects showed 24.8 per cent feeling 'distress/suffering' and 15.1 per cent 'sad and depressed'. Females reported higher pain intensity and more distress, depression and inadequate medication for pain relief (p<0.001). Distress and depression were associated with higher pain intensity. The developed questionnaire had tested reliability (test-retest r=0.89) and estimated validity. Conclusion: Cluster analysis showed constituent groups with a range of psychosocial effects in acute postoperative dental extraction pain and is associated with an increase in pain intensity.
Keyword Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine
Acute Pain
Chronic Orofacial Pain
Cluster Analysis
Biopsychosocial
Oral Surgery
Gender-differences
Analgesia
Disorders
Anxiety
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2007 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Dentistry Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 08:13:40 EST