Symptom reporting and associations with compensation status, self-awareness, causal attributions, and emotional wellbeing following traumatic brain injury

Ownsworth, Tamara, Fleming, Jennifer M. and Hardwick, Sascha (2006) Symptom reporting and associations with compensation status, self-awareness, causal attributions, and emotional wellbeing following traumatic brain injury. Brain Impairment, 7 2: 95-106. doi:10.1375/brim.7.2.95


Author Ownsworth, Tamara
Fleming, Jennifer M.
Hardwick, Sascha
Title Symptom reporting and associations with compensation status, self-awareness, causal attributions, and emotional wellbeing following traumatic brain injury
Journal name Brain Impairment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1443-9646
Publication date 2006-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1375/brim.7.2.95
Volume 7
Issue 2
Start page 95
End page 106
Total pages 12
Editor J. Douglas
R. Tate
Place of publication Bowen Hills, Qld, Australia
Publisher Published for the ASSBI by Australian Academic Press
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730303 Occupational, speech and physiotherapy
Abstract Individuals seeking compensation following traumatic brain injury (TBI) are often found to report a disproportionately high level of symptoms relative to objective indicators of impairment. Previous studies highlight that level of symptom reporting is also related to self-awareness, causal attribution, and emotional wellbeing. Therefore, the reasons for high symptom reporting in the context of compensation are generally unclear. This study aimed to identify whether self-awareness, causal attribution, and emotional wellbeing are significantly associated with level of symptom reporting after controlling for compensation status. A sample of 54 participants with TBI comprised two groups, namely, claimants (n = 27) and non-claimants (n = 27), who were similar in terms of demographic and neuro-cognitive variables. Participants completed the Symptom Expectancy Checklist, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, Awareness Questionnaire and a causal attribution scale. A series of independent t tests and Pearson's correlations identified that a higher level of symptom reporting was associated with the following: seeking compensation, less severe TBI, increased age, greater self-awareness, increased post-injury changes reported by relatives, a higher level of mood symptoms, and a tendency to blame other people. Multivariate analysis identified that after controlling for demographic, injury, and compensation status variables, level of mood symptoms and self-awareness were significantly associated with level of symptom reporting. The findings suggest that mood symptoms and heightened self-awareness are significantly related to high symptom reporting independent of compensation status, thus supporting the need for clinicians to interpret symptom reporting within a biopsychosocial context.
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 08:10:36 EST