Family, work and health - The impact of marriage, parenthood and employment on self-reported health of Australian men and women

Hewitt, B, Baxter, J and Western, M (2006) Family, work and health - The impact of marriage, parenthood and employment on self-reported health of Australian men and women. Journal of Sociology, 42 1: 61-78. doi:10.1177/1440783306061353

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Author Hewitt, B
Baxter, J
Western, M
Title Family, work and health - The impact of marriage, parenthood and employment on self-reported health of Australian men and women
Journal name Journal of Sociology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-7833
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1440783306061353
Volume 42
Issue 1
Start page 61
End page 78
Total pages 18
Editor K. Carrington
P. Corrigan
M. Gibson
J. Scott and S. Thiele
Place of publication London
Publisher Sage
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
370100 Sociology
730218 Social structure and health
Abstract We investigate multiple-burden and multiple-attachment hypotheses for the association among marriage, parenthood, employment and health for Australian men and women. Using longitudinal data from the Australian panel survey, 'Negotiating the Lifecourse', we find that men and women employed full time report better health than those employed part time or not employed. Previously married women report worse health than married women, but there is no association between marital status and health for men. We also find that men with preschool children in the household report worse health than men with older children, whereas women with preschool children report better health than women with older children. In addition for women we find evidence of a role-burden where combining full-time employment and children has a negative impact on health, but combining children with part-time or no employment has a beneficial health effect. There are no health effects of combining roles for men.
Keyword Sociology
Employment Status
Marital Status
Parenthood
Self-reported Health
Multiple Roles
Social Roles
Rated Health
Well
Mortality
Gender
Divorce
1990s
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 08:07:07 EST