Widespread brain activity during an abdominal task markedly reduced after pain physiology education: fMRI evaluation of a single patient with chronic low back pain

Moseley, G. L. (2005) Widespread brain activity during an abdominal task markedly reduced after pain physiology education: fMRI evaluation of a single patient with chronic low back pain. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 51 1: 49-52.


Author Moseley, G. L.
Title Widespread brain activity during an abdominal task markedly reduced after pain physiology education: fMRI evaluation of a single patient with chronic low back pain
Journal name Australian Journal of Physiotherapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-9514
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 51
Issue 1
Start page 49
End page 52
Total pages 4
Editor Dr. Rob Herbert (Editor-in-Chief)
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Australian Physiotherapy Association
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730303 Occupational, speech and physiotherapy
1103 Clinical Sciences
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Abstract The way people with chronic low back pain think about pain can affect the way they move. This case report concerns a patient with chronic disabling low back pain who underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scans during performance of a voluntary trunk muscle task under three conditions: directly after training in the task and, after one week of practice, before and after a 2.5 hour pain physiology education session. Before education there was widespread brain activity during performance of the task, including activity in cortical regions known to be involved in pain, although the task was not painful. After education widespread activity was absent so that there was no brain activation outside of the primary somatosensory cortex. The results suggest that pain physiology education markedly altered brain activity during performance of the task. The data offer a possible mechanism for difficulty in acquisition of trunk muscle training in people with pain and suggest that the change in activity associated with education may reflect reduced threat value of the task.
Keyword Rehabilitation
Sport Sciences
Imaging
Cortical Activation
Motor Control
Motor Training
Physiotherapy
Transversus Abdominis
Questionnaire
Disability
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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