Measuring the ability of school children with a history of otitis media to understand everyday speech

Keogh, Tegan, Kei, Joseph, Driscoll, Carlie, Cahill, Louise, Hoffmann, Alison, Wilce, Emma, Kondamuri, Prasanth and Marinac, Julie (2005) Measuring the ability of school children with a history of otitis media to understand everyday speech. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 16 5: 301-311. doi:10.3766/jaaa.16.5.5


Author Keogh, Tegan
Kei, Joseph
Driscoll, Carlie
Cahill, Louise
Hoffmann, Alison
Wilce, Emma
Kondamuri, Prasanth
Marinac, Julie
Title Measuring the ability of school children with a history of otitis media to understand everyday speech
Journal name Journal of the American Academy of Audiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1050-0545
2157-3107
Publication date 2005-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3766/jaaa.16.5.5
Volume 16
Issue 5
Start page 301
End page 311
Total pages 11
Editor James Jerger
Place of publication Reston, VA, United States
Publisher American Academy of Audiology
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
321025 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Hearing and Speech
730111 Hearing, vision, speech and their disorders
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy)
Abstract The present study compared the ability of school-aged children with and without a history of otitis media (OM) to understand everyday speech in noise using the University of Queensland Understanding of Everyday Speech Test (UQUEST). Participants were 484 children (246 boys, 238 girls) attending Grade 3 (272, mean age = 8.25 yr., SD = 0.43) and Grade 4 (212, mean age = 9.28 yr., SD = 0.41) at 19 primary schools in Brisbane metropolitan and Sunshine Coast schools. Children selected for inclusion were native speakers of English with normal hearing on the day of testing and had no reported physical or behavioral impairments. The children were divided into three groups according to the number of episodes of OM since birth. The results showed no significant differences in speech scores across the participant groups. However, a significant difference in mean speech scores was found across the grades and the noise conditions. Although children with a history of OM performed equally well at a group level when compared to the controls, they exhibited a large range of abilities in speech comprehension within the same group.
Keyword Connected discourse
Everyday speech
Otitis-media
Speech perception
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 07:51:36 EST