The association between early minor motor difficulties in extreme low birth weight infants and school age attentional difficulties

Jeyaseelan, D., O'Callaghan, M., Neulinger, K., Shum, D. and Burns, Y. (2006) The association between early minor motor difficulties in extreme low birth weight infants and school age attentional difficulties. Early Human Development, 82 4: 249-255. doi:10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2005.10.012


Author Jeyaseelan, D.
O'Callaghan, M.
Neulinger, K.
Shum, D.
Burns, Y.
Title The association between early minor motor difficulties in extreme low birth weight infants and school age attentional difficulties
Journal name Early Human Development   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-3782
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2005.10.012
Volume 82
Issue 4
Start page 249
End page 255
Total pages 7
Editor E. F. Maalouf
Place of publication Ireland
Publisher Elsevier Ireland Ltd
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
730204 Child health
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
321019 Paediatrics
Abstract Introduction: Extremely premature infants of normal intellectual ability have an increased prevalence of motor and attentional difficulties. Knowledge of the relationship between early motor difficulties and measures of attention at school age would enhance understanding of these developmental pathways, their interrelationship and opportunities for intervention. Objective: This study examines whether an association exists between early findings of minor motor difficulties and school age clinical and psychometric measures of attention. Methodology: 45/60 eligible ELBW(1000 g) or preterm (< 27/40 gestation) infants born at the Mater Mother's Hospital were assessed at 12 and 24 months for minor motor deficits (using NSMDA) and at 7-9 years for attention, using clinical (Conners and Du Paul Rating Scales) and psychometric (assessing attention span, selective and divided attention) measures. Results: NSMDA at 12 months was only associated with the psychometric measures of verbal attention span. It was not associated with later clinical measures of attention. NSMDA at 24months was strongly associated with specific clinical measures of attention at school age, independent of biological and social factors. It was not associated with psychometric measures of attention. Conclusion: The major finding of this study is that motor difficulties in ELBW infants at 2 years are associated with later clinical measures of attention. Possible mechanisms underlying this relationship are considered. Crown Copyright (c) 2005 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Obstetrics & Gynecology
Pediatrics
Very-low
Executive Functions
7-year-old Children
Preschool-children
Preterm Infants
Working-memory
Born Preterm
Outcomes
Brain
Adhd
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2007 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 07:51:21 EST