Matching poultry production with available feed resources: issues and constraints

Farrell, D. J. (2005) Matching poultry production with available feed resources: issues and constraints. Worlds Poultry Science Journal, 61 2: 298-307. doi:10.1079/WPS200456


Author Farrell, D. J.
Title Matching poultry production with available feed resources: issues and constraints
Journal name Worlds Poultry Science Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-9339
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1079/WPS200456
Volume 61
Issue 2
Start page 298
End page 307
Total pages 10
Editor D. Martin
Place of publication The Netherlands
Publisher World's Poultry Science Association
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
300403 Animal Nutrition
630106 Poultry
Abstract Corn and soyabeans may not be available in many countries particularly those which do not have sufficient foreign currency or the capacity to grow them. This paper outlines strategies that may be important under these circumstances. Alternative feedstuffs and various feeding systems may be used to support poultry production. Alternative ingredients such as rice bran, pearl millet, cottonseed meal and grain legumes are discussed. Evidence is presented showing that amino acid requirements of layers and broilers may be too generous particularly in countries where climate, management and disease can impose production constraints. The ability of finishing broilers to perform well on very low-energy diets allows the inclusion of alternative feeds and by-products into formulations. Very low protein diets based on cereals and free amino acids can be used for layers without loss of performance. Self-selection of feedstuffs may be an important strategy in reducing feed costs of broilers and layers. The concept of matching production with available feed resources may compromise broiler growth and egg production, but in many countries this may be the most economical choice. Countries in the humid tropics usually have reduced poultry performance. The effects of high temperature and humidity are difficult to overcome. The vexed questions of the escalation in the price of fossil fuel and the outbreak of avian influenza, both seemingly without a solution, are clouds hanging over an otherwise buoyant industry.
Keyword Agriculture, Dairy & Animal Science
Alternative Feeds
Low Protein Diets
Self-selection
Amino Acid Specifications
Oil, Environment
Rice Bran
Diets
Broilers
Choice
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: 2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 07:47:02 EST