Molecular identity of the unique symbiotic dinoflagellates found in the bioeroding demosponge Cliona oreintalis

Schoenberg, C. and Loh, W. K. W. (2005) Molecular identity of the unique symbiotic dinoflagellates found in the bioeroding demosponge Cliona oreintalis. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 299 157-166. doi:10.3354/meps299157


Author Schoenberg, C.
Loh, W. K. W.
Title Molecular identity of the unique symbiotic dinoflagellates found in the bioeroding demosponge Cliona oreintalis
Journal name Marine Ecology Progress Series   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0171-8630
1616-1599
Publication date 2005-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3354/meps299157
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 299
Start page 157
End page 166
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publisher Inter-Research
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Symbiodinium spp. are well-known symbionts of corals. A number of key species of bioeroding sponges also contain intracellular dinoflagellate symbionts, but little is known about this relationship. The origin and identity of sponge symbiotic inoflagellates is unresolved since theirdiscovery in 1964. Symbiotic bioeroding sponges can invade and kill live corals. If the sponges acquire symbionts during this process, they may act as refuges for vulnerable coral symbionts, as bioeroding sponges appear to be more resistant to thermal bleaching than most corals. To test this hypothesis, pairwise tissue samples from the common brown bioeroding sponge Cliona orientalis Thiele, 1900 and from abutting corals were taken. Samples were obtained from 3 disparate regions of northeastern Australia, extending over more than 1300 km. The genetic identities and population diversities of Symbiodinium from sponges and respective host corals were surveyed using 28S RNA gene sequences. Results suggest that C. orientalis consistently harbours the same clade of symbionts, even in very different environmental conditions. However, populations of sponge Symbiodinium did not appear to be genetically connected between the sampled regions, implying maternal transmission of the symbionts. Furthermore, the sponge zooxanthellae were different to those found in corals. We thus rejected the hypotheses that (1) the sponge acquires its symbionts from invaded corals under normal conditions and (2) that it may offer a refuge to coral symbionts. Symbionts from C. orientalis were closely related to, but distinct from symbionts of soritid foraminiferans, and are likely to belong to a new subclade of G-type dinoflagellates.
Keyword Symbiosis
Molecular identity
Dinoflagellata
Symbiodinium
Porifera
Cliona orientalis
Great Barrier Reef
Q-Index Code C1

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 39 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 17:46:28 EST