Aboriginal self-determination in Australia - The effects of minority-majority frames and target universalism on majority collective guilt and compensation attitudes

Reid, Scott A., Gunter, Helen N. and Smith, Joanne R. (2005) Aboriginal self-determination in Australia - The effects of minority-majority frames and target universalism on majority collective guilt and compensation attitudes. Human Communication Research, 31 2: 189-211. doi:10.1093/hcr/31.2.189

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Author Reid, Scott A.
Gunter, Helen N.
Smith, Joanne R.
Title Aboriginal self-determination in Australia - The effects of minority-majority frames and target universalism on majority collective guilt and compensation attitudes
Journal name Human Communication Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0360-3989
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/hcr/31.2.189
Volume 31
Issue 2
Start page 189
End page 211
Total pages 23
Editor James P. Dillard
Place of publication USA
Publisher Blackwell
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
380105 Social and Community Psychology
780108 Behavioural and cognitive sciences
Abstract In the context of Aboriginal-Anglo Australian relations, we tested the effect of framing (multiculturalism versus separatism) and majority group members' social values (universalism) on the persuasiveness of Aboriginal group rhetoric, majority collective guilt, attitudes toward compensation, and reparations for Aboriginals. As predicted, Anglo Australians who are low on universalism report more collective guilt when presented with a multiculturalist than a separatist Aboriginal frame, whereas those high on universalism report high levels of guilt independent of frame. The same pattern was predicted and found for the persuasiveness of the rhetoric and attitudes toward compensation. Our data suggest that (a) for individuals low in universalism, framing produces attitudes consonant with compensation because it produces collective guilt and (b) the reason that universalists are more in favor of compensation and reparation is because of high collective guilt. We discuss the strategic use of language to create power through the manipulation of collective guilt in political contexts.
Keyword Communication
White Guilt
Power
Exclusion
Identity
Q-Index Code C1

 
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