Carvedilol reduces the costs of medical care in severe heart failure: An economic analysis of the COPERNICUS study applied to the United Kingdom

Stewart, Simon, McMurray, John J. V., Hebborn, Ansgar, Coats, Andrew J. S., Packer, Milton and COPERNICUS Study Grp (2005) Carvedilol reduces the costs of medical care in severe heart failure: An economic analysis of the COPERNICUS study applied to the United Kingdom. International Journal of Cardiology, 100 1: 143-149. doi:10.1016/j.ijcard.2004.12.003


Author Stewart, Simon
McMurray, John J. V.
Hebborn, Ansgar
Coats, Andrew J. S.
Packer, Milton
COPERNICUS Study Grp
Title Carvedilol reduces the costs of medical care in severe heart failure: An economic analysis of the COPERNICUS study applied to the United Kingdom
Journal name International Journal of Cardiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0167-5273
1874-1754
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijcard.2004.12.003
Volume 100
Issue 1
Start page 143
End page 149
Total pages 7
Editor C. Kawai
A.J.S. Coats
Place of publication Shannon, Co. Clare Ireland
Publisher Elsevier Ireland
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of carvedilol on the costs related to the treatment of severe chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods: Costs for the treatment for heart failure within the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom (UK) were applied to resource utilisation data prospectively collected in all patients randomized into the Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival (COPERNICUS) Study. Unit-specific, per them (hospital bed day) costs were used to calculate expenditures due to hospitalizations. We also included costs of carvedilol treatment, general practitioner surgery/office visits, hospital out-patient clinic visits and nursing home care based on estimates derived from validated patterns of clinical practice in the UK. Results: The estimated cost of carvedilol therapy and related ambulatory care for the 1156 patients assigned to active treatment was 530,771 pound (44.89 pound per patient/month of follow-up). However, patients assigned to carvedilol were hospitalised less often and accumulated fewer and less expensive days of admission. Consequently, the total estimated cost of hospital care was 3.49 pound million in the carvedilol group compared with 4.24 pound million for the 1133 patients in the placebo arm. The cost of post-discharge care was also less in the carvedilol than in the placebo group (479,200 pound vs. 548,300) pound. Overall, the cost per patient treated in the carvedilol group was 3948 pound compared to 4279 pound in the placebo group. This equated to a cost of 385.98 pound vs. 434.18 pound, respectively, per patient/month of follow-up: an 11.1% reduction in health care costs in favour of carvedilol. Conclusions: These findings suggest that not only can carvedilol treatment increase survival and reduce hospital admissions in patients with severe CHF but that it can also cut costs in the process.
Keyword Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
Heart Failure
Beta Blockers
Cost Evaluation
Morbidity
Carvedilol
United Kingdom
Cardiac-insufficiency Bisoprolol
Randomized Intervention Trial
Merit-hf
Survival
Hospitalization
Epidemic
Population
Metoprolol
Mortality
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 07:40:15 EST