Late pleistocene to holocene composite speleothem O-18 and C-13 chronologies from south island, new Zealand-did a global younger dryas really exist?

Williams, P. W., King, D. N. T., Zhao, J. X. and Collerson, K. D. (2005) Late pleistocene to holocene composite speleothem O-18 and C-13 chronologies from south island, new Zealand-did a global younger dryas really exist?. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 230 3-4: 301-317. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2004.10.024


Author Williams, P. W.
King, D. N. T.
Zhao, J. X.
Collerson, K. D.
Title Late pleistocene to holocene composite speleothem O-18 and C-13 chronologies from south island, new Zealand-did a global younger dryas really exist?
Journal name Earth and Planetary Science Letters   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0012-821X
1385-013X
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.epsl.2004.10.024
Volume 230
Issue 3-4
Start page 301
End page 317
Total pages 17
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier Science BV
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
260301 Geochronology and Isotope Geochemistry
260602 Climatology (incl. Palaeoclimatology)
780104 Earth sciences
Abstract Oxygen and carbon data from eight stalagmites from northwest South Island are combined to produce composite records of delta(18)O and delta(13)C from 23.4 ka to the present. The chronology is anchored by 43 thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) uranium series ages. Delta O-18 values are interpreted as having a first order positive relationship to temperature, but also to be influenced by precipitation in a complex manner. Delta C-13 is interpreted as responding negatively to increases in atmospheric CO, concentration, biological activity and precipitation amount. Six climatic phases are recognized. After adjustment of 1.2parts per thousand for the ice volume effect, the delta(18)O record between 23 and 18 ka varies around -3.72parts per thousand compared to the Holocene average of -3.17parts per thousand. Late-glacial warming commenced between 18.2 and 17.8 ka and accelerated after 16.7 ka, culminating in a positive excursion between 14.70 and 13.53 ka. This was followed by a significant negative excursion between 13.53 and 11.14 ka of up to 0.55parts per thousand depth that overlapped the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR) and spanned the Younger Dryas (YD). Positive delta(18)O excursions at 11.14 ka and 6.91-6.47 ka represent the warmest parts of the Holocene. The mid-Holocene from 6 to 2 ka was marked by negative excursions that coincide with increased glacial activity in the South Island. A short positive excursion from 0.71 to 0.57 ka was slightly later than the Medieval Warm Period of Europe. Delta C-13 values were high until 17.79 ka after which there was an abrupt decrease to 17.19 ka followed by a steady decline to a minimum at 10.97 ka. Then followed a general increase, suggesting a drying trend, to 3.23 ka followed by a further general decline. The abrupt decrease in delta-values after 17.79 ka probably corresponds to an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration, biological activity and wetness at the end of the Last Glaciation, but the reversal identified in the delta(18)O record from 13.53 to 11.14 ka was not reflected in delta(13)C changes. The lowest delta(13)C values coincided with the early Holocene climatic suboptimum when conditions were relatively wet as well as mild. Major trends in the delta(18)O(c) record are similar to the Northern Hemisphere, but second order detail is often distinctly different. Consequently, at the millennial scale, a more convincing case can be made for asymmetric climatic response between the two hemispheres rather than synchronicity. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keyword Geochemistry & Geophysics
Climate Change
Palaeoclimate
Speleothems
Stable Isotopes
Quatemary
New Zealand
Last Glacial Maximum
Climate-change
Sea-level
Atmospheric Co2
North-island
Isotopic Composition
Vegetation Change
Palaeo-climate
Cave System
Ice-core
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 07:30:13 EST