Perceptual speed does not cause intelligence, and intelligence does not cause perceptual speed

Luciano, Michelle, Posthuma, Danielle, Wright, Margaret J., de Geus, Eco J. C., Smith, Glen A., Geffen, Gina M., Boomsma, Dorret I. and Martin, Nicholas G. (2005) Perceptual speed does not cause intelligence, and intelligence does not cause perceptual speed. Biological Psychology, 70 1: 1-8. doi:10.1016/j.biopsycho.2004.11.011


Author Luciano, Michelle
Posthuma, Danielle
Wright, Margaret J.
de Geus, Eco J. C.
Smith, Glen A.
Geffen, Gina M.
Boomsma, Dorret I.
Martin, Nicholas G.
Title Perceptual speed does not cause intelligence, and intelligence does not cause perceptual speed
Journal name Biological Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0301-0511
1873-6246
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2004.11.011
Volume 70
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Editor R. F. Simons
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
389999 Other Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences
730299 Public health not elsewhere classified
Abstract There is ongoing debate whether the efficiency of local cognitive processes leads to global cognitive ability or whether global ability feeds the efficiency of basic processes. A prominent example is the well-replicated association between inspection time (IT), a measure of perceptual discrimination speed, and intelligence (IQ), where it is not known whether increased speed is a cause or consequence of high IQ. We investigated the direction of causation between IT and IQ in 2012 genetically related subjects from Australia and The Netherlands. Models in which the reliable variance of each observed variable was specified as a latent trait showed IT correlations of -0.44 and -0.33 with respective Performance and Verbal IQ; heritabilities were 57% (IT), 83% (PIQ) and 77% (VIQ). Directional causation models provided poor fits to the data, with covariation best explained by pleiotropic genes (influencing variation in both IT and IQ). This finding of a common genetic factor provides a better target for identifying genes involved in cognition than genes which are unique to specific traits.
Keyword Inspection Time
Direction Of causation
Genetic Modelling
Twin Study
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 07:29:56 EST