Effective leadership in salient groups: Revisiting leader-member exchange theory from the perspective of the social identity theory of leadership

Hogg, Michael A., Martin, Robin, Epitropaki, Olga, Mankad, Aditi, Svensson, Alicia and Weeden, Karen (2005) Effective leadership in salient groups: Revisiting leader-member exchange theory from the perspective of the social identity theory of leadership. Personality And Social Psychology Bulletin, 31 7: 991-1004. doi:10.1177/0146167204273098


Author Hogg, Michael A.
Martin, Robin
Epitropaki, Olga
Mankad, Aditi
Svensson, Alicia
Weeden, Karen
Title Effective leadership in salient groups: Revisiting leader-member exchange theory from the perspective of the social identity theory of leadership
Journal name Personality And Social Psychology Bulletin   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0146-1672
Publication date 2005-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0146167204273098
Volume 31
Issue 7
Start page 991
End page 1004
Total pages 14
Editor Sara Miller McCune
Place of publication USA
Publisher Sage
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
380108 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
759999 Other social development and community services
Abstract Two studies compared leader-member exchange (LMX) theory and the social identity theory of leadership. Study 1 surveyed 439 employees of organizations in Wales, measuring Work group salience, leader-member relations, and perceived leadership effectiveness. Study 2 surveyed 128 members of organizations in India, measuring identification not salience and also individualism/collectivism. Both studies provided good support for social identity predictions. Depersonalized leader-member relations were associated with greater leadership effectiveness among high- than low-salient groups (Study 1) and among high than low identifiers (Study 2). Personalized leadership effectiveness was less affected by salience (Study 1) and unaffected by identification (Study 2). Low-salience groups preferred personalized leadership more than did high-salience groups (Study 1). Low identifiers showed no preference but high identifiers preferred depersonalized leadership (Study 2). In Study 2, collectivists did not Prefer depersonalized as opposed to personalized leadership, whereas individualists did, probably because collectivists focus more on the relational self.
Keyword Psychology, Social
Leadership
Social Identity
Lmx
Group Processes
Self
Transformational Leadership
Categorization Theory
Cultural Contexts
Model
Stereotypicality
Prototypicality
Identification
Perceptions
Multilevel
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 07:27:44 EST