Association of public support for survival of wildlife species with their likeability

Tisdell, Clem, Wilson, Clevo and Swarna Nantha, Hemanath (2005) Association of public support for survival of wildlife species with their likeability. Anthrozoos, 18 2: 160-174. doi:10.2752/089279305785594216


Author Tisdell, Clem
Wilson, Clevo
Swarna Nantha, Hemanath
Title Association of public support for survival of wildlife species with their likeability
Journal name Anthrozoos   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0892-7936
1753-0377
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2752/089279305785594216
Volume 18
Issue 2
Start page 160
End page 174
Total pages 15
Editor A. L. Podberscek
Place of publication US
Publisher Purdue University Press
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
340202 Environment and Resource Economics
729999 Economic issues not elsewhere classified
Abstract We surveyed 204 individuals from the general public in Brisbane, Australia, to ascertain the extent to which they liked or disliked 24 species of wildlife (belonging to three classes: mammals, birds and reptiles) present in tropical Australia. We calculated likeability indices for each species. We also asked respondents if they favored the survival of each of these species, and were able to calculate the percentage of respondents favoring survival of each. Using linear regression analysis, we could relate the percentage of respondents favoring survival of each of the species to their indices of likeability. In addition, we compared the mean likeability of species in the three classes (mammals, birds and reptiles) with the respondents' allocation of funds (hypothetical 1,000 Australian dollars) between conservation of species and a human charity. From this, we were able to assess how important stated likeability is for preferences to conserve species by animal class, and reconsidered the hypothesis in the literature that there is likely to be more public support for the survival of mammals than for birds, and more support for the survival of birds than for reptiles.
Keyword Veterinary Sciences
Anthropology
Environmental Studies
Conservation
Likeability
Similarity Principle
Wildlife
Willingness-to-pay
Contingent Valuation
Preservation
Information
Animals
Biodiversity
Attitudes
Values
Goods
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 07:25:54 EST