Prevalence of naturally occurring Dirofilaria immitis infection amona nondomestic cats housed in an area in which heartworms are endemic

Atkins, Clarke, Moresco, Anneke and Litster, Annette (2005) Prevalence of naturally occurring Dirofilaria immitis infection amona nondomestic cats housed in an area in which heartworms are endemic. Journal of The American Veterinary Medical Association, 227 1: 139-143. doi:10.2460/javma.2005.227.139


Author Atkins, Clarke
Moresco, Anneke
Litster, Annette
Title Prevalence of naturally occurring Dirofilaria immitis infection amona nondomestic cats housed in an area in which heartworms are endemic
Journal name Journal of The American Veterinary Medical Association   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-1488
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2460/javma.2005.227.139
Volume 227
Issue 1
Start page 139
End page 143
Total pages 5
Editor Janis H. Audin
Place of publication USA
Publisher American Veterinary Medical Association
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
300501 Veterinary Medicine
780105 Biological sciences
Formatted abstract


Objective—To determine prevalences of heartworm exposure (ie, positive heartworm antibody test results) and heartworm infection (ie, positive heartworm antigen test results or identification of mature heartworms at necropsy) among nondomestic cats housed in an area in rural North Carolina where Dirofilaria immitis is known to be endemic and among nondomestic cats housed in areas with a low prevalence of dirofilariasis or in an area considered to be free from heartworms.

Design—Cross-sectional prevalence survey.

Animals—97 nondomestic cats in North Carolina (study population) and 29 nondomestic cats in Colorado; Queensland, Australia; or Auckland, New Zealand (control population).

Procedure—Results of serologic tests and postmortem examinations were reviewed.

Results—Results of heartworm antibody tests were positive for 57 of 75 (76%) study cats and 1 of 29 (3%) control cats. Male study cats had a significantly higher risk of heartworm exposure than did female study cats (relative risk, 1.3). Results of heartworm antigen tests were negative for all 47 study cats and 16 control cats that were tested. Postmortem examinations were performed on 21 study cats, and 1 (5%) was found to be infected with heartworms.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that nondomestic cats housed outdoors in the southeastern United States are at risk for heartworm exposure and infection, with male cats having a greater risk of exposure than female cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:139–143)

Keyword Dirofilaria Immitis
Cats
Endemic
Veterinary Sciences
Disease
Diagnosis
Helminths
Coyotes
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 07:22:57 EST