Altitudinal variation in behavioural thermoregulation: Local adaptation vs. plasticity in California grasshoppers

Samietz, J., Salser, M. A. and Dingle, H. (2005) Altitudinal variation in behavioural thermoregulation: Local adaptation vs. plasticity in California grasshoppers. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 18 4: 1087-1096.


Author Samietz, J.
Salser, M. A.
Dingle, H.
Title Altitudinal variation in behavioural thermoregulation: Local adaptation vs. plasticity in California grasshoppers
Journal name Journal of Evolutionary Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1010-061X
1420-9101
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2005.00893.x
Volume 18
Issue 4
Start page 1087
End page 1096
Total pages 10
Editor D. J. Fairbarin
J. Merila
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
270504 Invertebrate Biology
771104 Control of pests and exotic species
Abstract We investigated the adaptive significance of behavioural thermoregulation in univoltine populations of the grasshopper Melanoplus sanguinipes along an altitudinal gradient in California using laboratory tests of animals raised under different temperatures. Trials consisted of continuous body temperature measurements with semi-implanted microprobes in a test arena, and observation and simultaneous recording of behavioural responses. These responses included mobility, basking and orientation of the body axes (aspect angle) towards a radiation source. Mobility and basking are determined by the altitudinal origin of the parental generation and not by the temperature treatments. With increasing altitude, individuals tend increasingly to raise body temperatures via mobility and increased basking. In contrast, body orientation towards the radiation source is influenced by the temperature treatments but not by the altitude of origin. Individuals experiencing higher temperatures during rearing show a lower tendency to lateral flanking. We conclude that body orientation responses are not adapted locally. In contrast other components of the behavioural syndrome that increase body temperature, such as mobility and basking, are adaptive in response to local selection pressure. The thermoregulatory syndrome of these grasshoppers is an important contribution to life-history adaptations that appropriately match season lengths.
Keyword Altitude
Behaviour
Ectotherm
Life hitory
Local adaptation
Temperature
Themoregulation
Thermoregulatory behaviour
Q-Index Code C1

 
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