Brain maps, great and small: lessons from comparative studies of primate visual cortical organization

Rosa, M. G. P. and Tweedale, R. (2005) Brain maps, great and small: lessons from comparative studies of primate visual cortical organization. Royal Society of London. Philosophical Transactions. Biological Sciences, 360 1456: 665-691. doi:10.1098/rstb.2005.1626


Author Rosa, M. G. P.
Tweedale, R.
Title Brain maps, great and small: lessons from comparative studies of primate visual cortical organization
Journal name Royal Society of London. Philosophical Transactions. Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8436
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2005.1626
Volume 360
Issue 1456
Start page 665
End page 691
Total pages 27
Editor S. Zeki
J. Joseph
Place of publication London
Publisher The Royal Society
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
320702 Central Nervous System
730104 Nervous system and disorders
Abstract In this paper, we review evidence from comparative studies of primate cortical organization, highlighting recent findings and hypotheses that may help us to understand the rules governing evolutionary changes of the cortical map and the process of formation of areas during development. We argue that clear unequivocal views of cortical areas and their homologies are more likely to emerge for 'core' fields, including the primary sensory areas, which are specified early in development by precise molecular identification steps. In primates, the middle temporal area is probably one of these primordial cortical fields. Areas that form at progressively later stages of development correspond to progressively more recent evolutionary events, their development being less firmly anchored in molecular specification. The certainty with which areal boundaries can be delimited, and likely homologies can be assigned, becomes increasingly blurred in parallel with this evolutionary/developmental sequence. For example, while current concepts for the definition of cortical areas have been vindicated in allowing a clarification of the organization of the New World monkey 'third tier' visual cortex (the third and dorsomedial areas, V3 and DM), our analyses suggest that more flexible mapping criteria may be needed to unravel the organization of higher-order visual association and polysensory areas.
Keyword Biology
Visual Cortex
Evolution
Development
Visuotopic Organization
Architecture
Marmoset
Superior Temporal Sulcus
Lateral Occipital Complex
New-world Monkeys
Comparative Cytoarchitectonic Analysis
Corticocortical Connection Patterns
Ventral Extrastriate Cortex
Cytochrome-oxidase Activity
Macaque Cerebral-cortex
Rhesus-monkey
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: 2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 108 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 112 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 07:05:28 EST