A comparison of responses to group learning between first-year Asian and first-year Australian veterinary science students

Mills, PC and Woodall, PF (2005) A comparison of responses to group learning between first-year Asian and first-year Australian veterinary science students. Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 32 4: 531-536.


Author Mills, PC
Woodall, PF
Title A comparison of responses to group learning between first-year Asian and first-year Australian veterinary science students
Journal name Journal of Veterinary Medical Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0748-321X
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3138/jvme.32.4.531
Volume 32
Issue 4
Start page 531
End page 536
Total pages 6
Editor Dr Donald Walsh
Place of publication USA
Publisher Assoc. of American Vet. Med. Colleges
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
300599 Veterinary Sciences not elsewhere classified
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract Introduction - Group learning has been used to enhance deep (long-term) learning and promote life skills, such as decision making, communication, and interpersonal skills. However, with increasing multiculturalism in higher education, there is little information available as to the acceptance of this form of learning by Asian students or as to its value to them. Methodology - Group-learning projects, incorporating a seminar presentation, were used in first-year veterinary anatomical science classes over two consecutive years (2003 and 2004) at the School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland. Responses of Australian and Asian students to survey forms evaluating the learning experience were analyzed and compared. Results - All students responded positively to the group learning, indicating that it was a useful learning experience and a great method for meeting colleagues. There were no significant differences between Asian and Australian students in overall responses to the survey evaluating the learning experience, except where Asian students responded significantly higher than Australian students in identifying specific skills that needed improving. Conclusions - Group learning can be successfully used in multicultural teaching to enhance deep learning. This form of learning helps to remove cultural barriers and establish a platform for continued successful group learning throughout the program.
Keyword Veterinary Sciences
Education
Q-Index Code C1

 
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