Articulatory function following traumatic brain injury in childhood: A perceptual and instrumental analysis

Cahill, LM, Murdoch, BE and Theodoros, DG (2005) Articulatory function following traumatic brain injury in childhood: A perceptual and instrumental analysis. Brain Injury, 19 1: 41-58. doi:10.1080/02699050410001719961


Author Cahill, LM
Murdoch, BE
Theodoros, DG
Title Articulatory function following traumatic brain injury in childhood: A perceptual and instrumental analysis
Journal name Brain Injury   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-9052
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02699050410001719961
Volume 19
Issue 1
Start page 41
End page 58
Total pages 18
Editor J. Kreutzer
N. Zasler
Place of publication UK
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730303 Occupational, speech and physiotherapy
Abstract Primary objective: To investigate the articulatory function of a group of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI), using both perceptual and instrumental techniques. Research design: The performance of 24 children with TBI was assessed on a battery of perceptual (Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment, Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech and speech sample analysis) and instrumental ( lip and tongue pressure transduction systems) assessments and compared with that of 24 non-neurologically impaired children matched for age and sex. Main outcomes: Perceptual assessment identified consonant and vowel imprecision, increased length of phonemes and overall reduction in speech intelligibility, while instrumental assessment revealed significant impairment in lip and tongue function in the TBI group, with rate and pressure in repetitive lip and tongue tasks particularly impaired. Significant negative correlations were identified between the degree of deviance of perceptual articulatory features and decreased function on many non-speech measures of lip function, as well as maximum tongue pressure and fine force tongue control at 20% of maximum tongue pressure. Additionally, sub-clinical articulatory deficits were identified in the children with TBI who were non-dysarthric. Conclusion: The results of the instrumental assessment of lip and tongue function support the finding of substantial articulatory dysfunction in this group of children following TBI. Hence, remediation of articulatory function should be a therapeutic priority in these children.
Keyword Neurosciences
Rehabilitation
Tongue Strength
Speech
Dysarthria
Force
Q-Index Code C1

 
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