An investigation of organic factors in the neuropsychological functioning of patients with borderline personality disorder

Travers, C. and King, R. (2005) An investigation of organic factors in the neuropsychological functioning of patients with borderline personality disorder. Journal of Personality Disorders, 19 1: 1-18. doi:10.1521/pedi.19.1.1.62181


Author Travers, C.
King, R.
Title An investigation of organic factors in the neuropsychological functioning of patients with borderline personality disorder
Journal name Journal of Personality Disorders   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0885-579X
Publication date 2005-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1521/pedi.19.1.1.62181
Volume 19
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Editor J. Livesley
W. J. Livesley
S. Weingarten
J. Nageotte
Place of publication New York, U.S.A.
Publisher Guilford Publications
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
321021 Psychiatry
730211 Mental health
Abstract The hypothesis to be tested in this study was that the cognitive deficits that have been documented in patients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) are largely the consequence of organic insult, either developmental or acquired. Using a cross-sectional design, 80 subjects (males and females) who met the criteria for BPD participated in the study. They completed a battery of neuropsychological tests and a comprehensive interview assessing organic status as well as measures of the potentially confounding factors of current levels of depression and anxiety. It was expected that BPD-patients with a probable history of organic insult would perform significantly worse than would BPD patients without such a history. Analyses of the results provided partial support for the hypothesis. Subjects with both BPD and a history of organic insult were significantly more impaired on several measures including measures of attention than were BPD only subjects. The results suggested that the impaired cognitive performance of persons diagnosed with BPD may, in part, be attributed to organic factors.
Keyword Psychiatry
Traumatic Brain-injury
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Abuse
Hippocampal
Neurobiology
Dysfunction
Amygdala
Adults
Women
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 06:40:33 EST