Experimental hand pain delays recognition of the contralateral hand: Evidence that acute and chronic pain have opposite effects on information processing?

Moseley, G. L., Sim, D. F., Henry, M. L. and Souvlis, T. (2005) Experimental hand pain delays recognition of the contralateral hand: Evidence that acute and chronic pain have opposite effects on information processing?. Cognitive Brain Research, 25 1: 188-194. doi:10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.05.008


Author Moseley, G. L.
Sim, D. F.
Henry, M. L.
Souvlis, T.
Title Experimental hand pain delays recognition of the contralateral hand: Evidence that acute and chronic pain have opposite effects on information processing?
Journal name Cognitive Brain Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0926-6410;1872-6348; 0006-8993; 0169-328X; 1385-299X; 1872-6240
Publication date 2005-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.05.008
Volume 25
Issue 1
Start page 188
End page 194
Total pages 7
Editor G. Mangun
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject 321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730303 Occupational, speech and physiotherapy
111004 Clinical Nursing: Tertiary (Rehabilitative)
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy)
1103 Clinical Sciences
170204 Linguistic Processes (incl. Speech Production and Comprehension)
1702 Cognitive Sciences
Abstract Recognising the laterality of a pictured hand involves making an initial decision and confirming that choice by mentally moving one's own hand to match the picture. This depends on an intact body schema. Because patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) take longer to recognise a hand's laterality when it corresponds to their affected hand, it has been proposed that nociceptive input disrupts the body schema. However, chronic pain is associated with physiological and psychosocial complexities that may also explain the results. In three studies, we investigated whether the effect is simply due to nociceptive input. Study one evaluated the temporal and perceptual characteristics of acute hand pain elicited by intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the thenar eminence. In studies two and three, subjects performed a hand laterality recognition task before, during, and after acute experimental hand pain, and experimental elbow pain, respectively. During hand pain and during elbow pain, when the laterality of the pictured hand corresponded to the painful side, there was no effect on response time (RT). That suggests that nociceptive input alone is not sufficient to disrupt the working body schema. Conversely to patients with CRPS1, when the laterality of the pictured hand corresponded to the non-painful hand, RT increased similar to 380 ms (95% confidence interval 190 ms-590 ms). The results highlight the differences between acute and chronic pain and may reflect a bias in information processing in acute pain toward the affected part.
Keyword Motor systems and sensorimotor integration
Control of posture and movement
Cognition
Body schema
Laterality recognition
Information processing
Complex regional pain syndrome
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 16:37:50 EST