Ability of Bioelectrical Impedance to Predict Percentage Fat Mass in Children of Two Different Ethnic Origins

Wickramasinghe, V. P., Cleghorn, G. J., Edmiston, K. A., Murphy, A. J., Abbott, R. A. and Davies, P. S. W. (2005) Ability of Bioelectrical Impedance to Predict Percentage Fat Mass in Children of Two Different Ethnic Origins. International Journal of Body Composition Research, 3 1: 5-14.


Author Wickramasinghe, V. P.
Cleghorn, G. J.
Edmiston, K. A.
Murphy, A. J.
Abbott, R. A.
Davies, P. S. W.
Title Ability of Bioelectrical Impedance to Predict Percentage Fat Mass in Children of Two Different Ethnic Origins
Journal name International Journal of Body Composition Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1479-456X
Publication date 2005
Volume 3
Issue 1
Start page 5
End page 14
Total pages 10
Editor E. Smith-Gordon
Place of publication Sussex, U.K.
Publisher Smith-Gordon
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
321019 Paediatrics
730204 Child health
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
Abstract Detailed analysis of body composition in children has helped to understand changes that occur in growth and disease. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has gained popularity as a simple, non-invasive and inexpensive tool of body composition assessment. Being an indirect technique, prediction equations have to be used in the assessment of body composition. There are many prediction equations available in the literature for the assessment of body composition from BIA. This study aims to cross-validate some of those prediction equations to determine the suitability of their use on Australian children of white Caucasian and Sri Lankan origins. Height, weight and BIA were measured. Total body water was measured using the isotope dilution method (D2O). Fat-mass (FM) and %FM were estimated from BIA using ten prediction equations described in the literature. Five to 14.99-year-old healthy, 96 white Caucasians and 42 Sri Lankan children were studied. The equation of Schaefer et al was the most suitable prediction equation for this group with the lowest mean bias for %FM assessment in both Caucasian (–1.0±9.6%) and Sri Lankan (1.6±5.2%) children and the fat content of the individuals did not influence the predictions by this equation. Impedance index (height2/impedance) explained for 80% of TBW in white Caucasians and 93% in Sri Lankans and figures were similar for the prediction of FFM. We conclude that BIA can be used effectively in the assessment of body composition in children. However, for the assessment of body composition using BIA, either prediction equations should be derived to suit the local populations or existing equations should be cross-validated to determine their suitability before their application.
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 06:28:22 EST