Teaching and learning population and preventive health: Challenges for modern medical curricula

Rego, Patricia M. and Dick, Marie-Louise (2005) Teaching and learning population and preventive health: Challenges for modern medical curricula. Medical Education, 39 2: 202-213. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2929.2004.02058.x


Author Rego, Patricia M.
Dick, Marie-Louise
Title Teaching and learning population and preventive health: Challenges for modern medical curricula
Journal name Medical Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0308-0110
1365-2923
Publication date 2005-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2929.2004.02058.x
Volume 39
Issue 2
Start page 202
End page 213
Total pages 12
Editor J. Bligh
J. Brice
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Blackwell Science
Language eng
Formatted abstract
OBJECTIVES This study aimed to formally identify medical students' attitudes towards population and preventive health issues addressed in the University of Queensland's Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) programme, in response to informal student reports that population and preventive health issues were largely just matters of 'common sense'.
METHODS
Year 2 medical students were surveyed in 1999 and 2000 using a custom-designed instrument incorporating Likert scales and requests for qualitative responses. A sample of students participated in semistructured interviews.
RESULTS
A total of 341 students (71%) responded to the survey. Students' attitudes towards general population health issues were overwhelmingly positive, and more than 60% of students reported having a more positive attitude towards psychosocial and preventive health issues than they had when they commenced the MBBS programme. Just over half of the students, however, considered population and preventive health issues to be matters of common sense. Students reported poor role modelling by the faculty in relation to population and preventive health issues, with only 41% of students indicating they perceived a positive attitude towards psychosocial and preventive health issues in the School of Medicine. Qualitative data indicated that some students fear that the opportunity cost of dedicating study time to population and preventive health issues might endanger their future clinical knowledge, skills and management of patients.
CONCLUSIONS These findings have important implications for modern medical curricula. The challenge in teaching population health issues is to balance students' needs to understand and apply the principles of population and preventive health and the biopsychosocial model of patient care, with the need for them to be confident they will be able to practise safely if they do so.
Keyword Education
Medical
Undergraduate
Methods
Attitude
Curriculum
Standards
Students
Psychology
Public Health
Preventive Health Services
Clinical Competence
Education, Scientific Disciplines
Health Care Sciences & Services
Education, Medical, Undergraduate, Methods
Curriculum, Standards
Students, Medical, Psychology
Public Health, Education
Clinical Competence, Standards
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes original research

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 06:24:56 EST