A falsification of the thermal specialization paradigm: compensation for elevated temperatures in Antarctic fishes

Seebacher, Frank, Davison, William, Lowe, Cara J. and Franklin, Craig E. (2005) A falsification of the thermal specialization paradigm: compensation for elevated temperatures in Antarctic fishes. Biology Letters, 1 2: 151-154. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2004.0280


Author Seebacher, Frank
Davison, William
Lowe, Cara J.
Franklin, Craig E.
Title A falsification of the thermal specialization paradigm: compensation for elevated temperatures in Antarctic fishes
Journal name Biology Letters   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1744-9561
Publication date 2005-06-22
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2004.0280
Volume 1
Issue 2
Start page 151
End page 154
Total pages 4
Editor Brian Charlesworth
Place of publication London
Publisher The Royal Society
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject CX
270700 Ecology and Evolution
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract Specialization to a particular environment is one of the main factors used to explain species distributions. Antarctic fishes are often cited as a classic example to illustrate the specialization process and are regarded as the archetypal stenotherms. Here we show that the Antarctic fish Pagothenia borchgrevinki has retained the capacity to compensate for chronic temperature change. By displaying astounding plasticity in cardiovascular response and metabolic control, the fishes maintained locomotory performance at elevated temperatures. Our falsification of the specialization paradigm indicates that the effect of climate change on species distribution and extinction may be overestimated by current models of global warming.
Keyword Biology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
cardiac scope
climate change
critical swimming speed
metabolism
plasticity
Trout Oncorhynchus-mykiss
Rainbow-trout
Seasonal Acclimatization
Evolutionary Physiology
Enzyme Expression
Muscle
Plasticity
Metabolism
Responses
Mitochondria
Q-Index Code CX
Additional Notes DOI:10.1098/rsbl.2004.0280

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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