Obesity is Associated with Worsening Cardiovascular Risk Factor Profiles and Proteinuria Progression in Renal Transplant Recipients

Armstrong, Kirsten A., Campbell, Scott B., Hawley, Carmel M., Nicol, David L., Johnson, David W. and Isbel, Nicole M. (2005) Obesity is Associated with Worsening Cardiovascular Risk Factor Profiles and Proteinuria Progression in Renal Transplant Recipients. American Journal of Transplantation, 5 11: 2710-2718. doi:10.1111/j.1600-6143.2005.01073.x


Author Armstrong, Kirsten A.
Campbell, Scott B.
Hawley, Carmel M.
Nicol, David L.
Johnson, David W.
Isbel, Nicole M.
Title Obesity is Associated with Worsening Cardiovascular Risk Factor Profiles and Proteinuria Progression in Renal Transplant Recipients
Journal name American Journal of Transplantation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1600-6135
Publication date 2005-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2005.01073.x
Volume 5
Issue 11
Start page 2710
End page 2718
Total pages 9
Editor P. F. Halloran
Place of publication Denmark
Publisher Blackwell Munksgaard
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject 730118 Organs, diseases and abnormal conditions not elsewhere classified
110312 Nephrology and Urology
Formatted abstract
Obesity is associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) parameters and may be involved in the pathogenesis of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients (RTR). We sought the spectrum of body mass index (BMI) and the relationships between BMI, CV parameters and allograft function in prevalent RTR. Data were collected at baseline and 2 years on 90 RTR (mean age 51 years, 53% male, median transplant duration 7 years), categorized by BMI (normal, BMI ≤ 24.9 kg/m2; pre-obese, BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2; obese, BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). Proteinuria and glomerular filtration rate (eGFRMDRD) were determined.

Nine percent RTR were obese pre-transplantation compared to 30% at baseline (p < 0.001) and follow-up (25 ± 2 months). As BMI increased, prevalence of metabolic syndrome and central obesity increased (12 vs 48 vs 85%, p < 0.001 and 3 vs 42 vs 96%, p < 0.001, respectively). Systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and lipid parameters changed significantly with BMI category and over time. Proteinuria progression occurred in 65% obese RTR (23 (13–59 g/mol creatinine) to 59 (25–120 g/mol creatinine)). BMI was independently associated with proteinuria progression (ß 0.01, p = 0.008) but not with changing eGFRMDRD. In conclusion, obesity is common in RTR and is associated with worsening CV parameters and proteinuria progression.
Keyword Surgery
Transplantation
Cardiovascular Risk
Obesity
Proteinuria
Renal Transplantation
Posttransplant Diabetes-mellitus
Body-mass Index
Kidney-transplantation
Metabolic Syndrome
Weight-gain
Prognostic Importance
Allograft Function
Disease
Patient
Impact
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 05:39:00 EST