On the nature of dogs, the right of grace, forgiveness and hospitality: Derrida, Kant, and Lars von Trier's Dogville

Atkinson, Adam (2005) On the nature of dogs, the right of grace, forgiveness and hospitality: Derrida, Kant, and Lars von Trier's Dogville. Senses of Cinema, 36 .

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Author Atkinson, Adam
Title On the nature of dogs, the right of grace, forgiveness and hospitality: Derrida, Kant, and Lars von Trier's Dogville
Formatted title
On the nature of dogs, the right of grace, forgiveness and hospitality: Derrida, Kant, and Lars von Trier's Dogville
Journal name Senses of Cinema
ISSN 1443-4059
Publication date 2005-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 36
Total pages 12
Editor R. Caputo
S. Murray
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher Senses of Cinema
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
410301 Film and Video
420302 Cultural Theory
750202 The creative arts
751004 The media
750201 The performing arts (incl. music, theatre and dance)
1904 Performing Arts and Creative Writing
Formatted abstract
Jacques Derrida, it would seem, does not often read fairytales – or, at least, fairytales have rarely found welcome as “privileged ‘examples’”, if there are any, in Derrida’s work. An obvious exception, perhaps, is “Le facteur de la vérité” in which Derrida cites, as an illustration of the way in which Lacan uses Poe, Freud’s citation of Anderson’s tale “The Emperor’s New Clothes” – a staging of intertextual hospitality in which one text welcomes or hosts another. Illustrating hospitality through an example of the illustrative capacity of “The Emperor’s New Clothes” is apt, given that even rarer than a fairytale in Derrida is a fairytale in any tradition that does not depict hospitality or “place [it] on stage”. More often than not, the protagonist must undertake a journey along unfamiliar paths and rely on the hospitality of others. Of course, there is always the possibility that the generous host is in fact a monster, who offers hospitality only to make a meal of the guest. Hänsel and Grethel, for example, quickly discover that the generous old woman who welcomes them into her gingerbread house is in reality a witch; that the hospitality offered them is conditional on their becoming a meal for their host. In what follows I hope to illustrate further the monstrous possibilities of hospitality through a Derridean reading of Lars Von Trier’s film Dogville (2003).
Keyword Culture -- study & teaching
Dogs
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Published under "The Metaphysics of Violence". Publication date: July–September 2005.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 15:27:23 EST