A Complementary Economy? National Markets and International Product in Early Australian Theatre Managements

Kelly, Veronica (2005) A Complementary Economy? National Markets and International Product in Early Australian Theatre Managements. New Theatre Quarterly, 21 1: 77-95. doi:10.1017/S0266464X04000351

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Author Kelly, Veronica
Title A Complementary Economy? National Markets and International Product in Early Australian Theatre Managements
Journal name New Theatre Quarterly   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0266-464X
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0266464X04000351
Volume 21
Issue 1
Start page 77
End page 95
Total pages 19
Editor C. Barker
S. Trussier
M. Shevtsova
Place of publication Cambridge UK
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
410102 Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies
750201 The performing arts (incl. music, theatre and dance)
Abstract The international circulation of commercial theatre in the early twentieth century was driven not only from the centres of Great Britain and the USA, but by the specific enterprise and habitus of managers in ‘complementary’ production sites such as Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand. The activity of this period suggests a de-centred competitive trade in theatrical commodities – whether performers, scripts, or productions – wherein the perceived entertainment preferences and geographies of non-metropolitan centres were formative of international enterprise. The major producers were linked in complex bonds of partnerships, family, or common experience which crossed the globe. The fractures and commonalities displayed in the partnerships of James Cassius Williamson and George Musgrove, which came to dominate and shape the fortunes of the Australian industry for much of the century, indicate the contradictory commercial and artistic pressures bearing upon entrepreneurs seeking to provide high-quality entertainment and form advantageous combinations in competition with other local and international managements. Clarke, Meynell and Gunn mounted just such spirited competition from 1906 to 1911, and their story demonstrates both the opportunities and the centralizing logic bearing upon local managements shopping and dealing in a global market. The author, Veronica Kelly, works at the University of Queensland. She is presently undertaking a study of commercial stars and managements in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Australia, with a focus on the star performer as model of history, gender, and nation.
Q-Index Code C1

 
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