A legitimate paradox: Neo-liberal reform and the return of the state in Korea

Hundt, D. (2005) A legitimate paradox: Neo-liberal reform and the return of the state in Korea. Journal of Development Studies, 41 2, February 2005: 242-260.


Author Hundt, D.
Title A legitimate paradox: Neo-liberal reform and the return of the state in Korea
Journal name Journal of Development Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0388
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/0022038042000309232
Volume 41
Issue 2, February 2005
Start page 242
End page 260
Total pages 19
Editor Chris Milner
Howard White
John Harriss
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
360100 Political Science
Abstract This article examines the neo-liberal reforms that the Kim government implemented in post-crisis Korea. It argues that by embracing the reforms, the state, paradoxicaliy, re-legitimised itself in the national political economy. The process of enacting the reforms completed the power shift from a collusive state-chaebol alliance towards a new alliance based on a more populist social contract - but one that nonetheless generally conformed to the tenets of neo-liberalism. Kim and his closest associates identified the malpractices of the chaebols as the main cause of the crisis, so reforming the chaebols would be the key to economic recovery. Combining populism and neo-liberalism, they drew on support from both domestic and international sources to rein in, rather than nurture, the chaebols.
Keyword Economics
Planning & Development
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Political Science and International Studies Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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