The genetic structure of Australian populations of Mycosphaerella musicola suggests restricted gene flow at the continental scale

Hayden, H. L., Carlier, J. and Aitken, E. A. B. (2005) The genetic structure of Australian populations of Mycosphaerella musicola suggests restricted gene flow at the continental scale. Phytopathology, 95 5: 489-498. doi:10.1094/PHYTO-95-0489


Author Hayden, H. L.
Carlier, J.
Aitken, E. A. B.
Title The genetic structure of Australian populations of Mycosphaerella musicola suggests restricted gene flow at the continental scale
Journal name Phytopathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-949X
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1094/PHYTO-95-0489
Volume 95
Issue 5
Start page 489
End page 498
Total pages 10
Editor S. Nelson
Place of publication St Paul
Publisher American Phytopathological Society
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject C1
270203 Population and Ecological Genetics
620205 Tropical fruit
270305 Mycology
270403 Plant Pathology
Abstract Mycosphaerello musicolo causes Sigatoka disease of banana and is endemic to Australia. The population genetic structure of M. musicola in Australia was examined by applying single-copy restriction fragment length polymorphism probes to hierarchically sampled populations collected along the Australian cast coast. The 363 isolates studied were from 16 plantations at 12 sites in four different regions, and comprised 11 populations. These populations displayed moderate levels of gene diversity (H = 0.142 to 0.369) and similar levels of genotypic richness and evenness. Populations were dominated by unique genotypes, but isolates sharing the same genotype (putative clones) were detected. Genotype distribution was highly localized within each population, and the majority of putative clones were detected for isolates sampled from different sporodochia in the same lesion or different lesions on a plant. Multilocus gametic disequilibrium tests provided further evidence of a degree of clonality within the populations at the plant scale. A complex pattern of population differentiation was detected for M. musicola in Australia. Populations sampled from plantations outside the two major production areas were genetically very different to all other populations. Differentiation was much lower between populations of the two major production areas, despite their geographic separation of over 1,000 km. These results suggest low gene flow at the continental scale due to limited spore dispersal and the movement of infected plant material.
Keyword Banana
Population Genetics
Sigatoka Disease
Anamorph Septoria-tritici
Leaf-spot
Multilocus Structure
Genotypic Diversity
Differentiation
Pathogen
Fijiensis
Climates
Fungus
Plant Sciences
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 05:25:41 EST