Encouraging practitioners to use resources: evaluation of the national implementation of a resource to improve the clinical management of alcohol-related problems in Indigenous primary care settings

Hunter, Ernest, Brown, Joanne and McCulloch, Brad (2004) Encouraging practitioners to use resources: evaluation of the national implementation of a resource to improve the clinical management of alcohol-related problems in Indigenous primary care settings. Drug And Alcohol Review, 23 1: 89-100. doi:10.1080/09595230410001645583


Author Hunter, Ernest
Brown, Joanne
McCulloch, Brad
Title Encouraging practitioners to use resources: evaluation of the national implementation of a resource to improve the clinical management of alcohol-related problems in Indigenous primary care settings
Journal name Drug And Alcohol Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0959-5236
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09595230410001645583
Volume 23
Issue 1
Start page 89
End page 100
Total pages 12
Editor J.B. Saunders
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor and Francis Ltd
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
321204 Mental Health
730211 Mental health
Abstract This paper reports on the evaluation of the implementation of the National Recommendations for the Clinical Management of Alcohol-Related Problems in Indigenous Primary Care Settings undertaken in 2001 through 74 standardized workshops, which sought to determine: ( 1) whether this approach to implementation influenced the likelihood that the National Recommendations would be used; ( 2) whether it influenced participants' willingness to engage with Indigenous patients regarding alcohol-related issues; and ( 3) whether the implementation as a whole influenced both practice and clinicians' willingness to engage. Evaluation included pre-/post-workshop and follow-up questionnaires and a focus group. The findings presented indicate that distribution of clinical resources alone is not sufficient to ensure use and that, particularly for medical practitioners, appropriate introduction not only increases use but also positively influences willingness to engage with alcohol-related problems as part of primary clinical care. Further, the enthusiasm for guideline production should be tempered by the need to develop effective implementation strategies.
Keyword Substance Abuse
Aboriginal
Alcohol
Guidelines
Implementation
Indigenous
Primary Care
Interventions
Misuse
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2005 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 15:15:04 EST