The effect of skin examination surveys on the incidence of basal cell carcinoma in a Queensland community sample: A 10-year longitudinal study

Valery, P. C., Neale, R., Williams, G., Pandeya, N., Siller, G. and Green, A. (2004) The effect of skin examination surveys on the incidence of basal cell carcinoma in a Queensland community sample: A 10-year longitudinal study. Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings, 9 2: 148-151. doi:10.1046/j.1087-0024.2003.09114.x


Author Valery, P. C.
Neale, R.
Williams, G.
Pandeya, N.
Siller, G.
Green, A.
Title The effect of skin examination surveys on the incidence of basal cell carcinoma in a Queensland community sample: A 10-year longitudinal study
Journal name Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1087-0024
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1046/j.1087-0024.2003.09114.x
Volume 9
Issue 2
Start page 148
End page 151
Total pages 4
Editor L.A. Goldsmith
Place of publication United States
Publisher Blackwell Publishing Inc.
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
321002 Dermatology
730210 Environmental health
Abstract Skin cancers pose a significant public health problem in high-risk populations. We have prospectively monitored basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) incidence in a Queensland community over a 10-y period by recording newly treated lesions, supplemented by skin examination surveys. Age-standardized incidence rates of people with new histologically confirmed BCC were 2787 per 100,000 person-years at risk (pyar) among men and 1567 per 100,000 pyar among women, and corresponding tumor rates were 5821 per 100,000 pyar and 2733 per 100,000 pyar, respectively. Incidence rates for men with new SCC were 944 per 100,000 pyar and for women 675 per 100,000 pyar; tumor rates were 1754 per 100,000 pyar and 846 per 100,000 pyar, respectively. Incidence rates of BCC tumors but not SCC tumors varied noticeably according to method of surveillance, with BCC incidence rates based on skin examination surveys around three times higher than background treatment rates. This was mostly due to an increase in diagnosis of new BCC on sites other than the head and neck, arms, and hands associated with skin examination surveys and little to do with advancing the time of diagnosis of BCC on these sites as seen by a return to background rates following the examination surveys. We conclude that BCC that might otherwise go unreported are detected during skin examination surveys and thus that such skin cancer screening can influence the apparent burden of skin cancer.
Keyword Dermatology
Site Distribution
Cancer
Prevention
Population
Trends
Trial
Age
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2005 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 15:12:32 EST