Reacting to an assumed situation vs. conforming to an assumed reaction: The role of perceived speaker attitude in vicarious dissonance

Monin, Benoft, Norton, Michael I., Cooper, Joel and Hogg, Michael A. (2004) Reacting to an assumed situation vs. conforming to an assumed reaction: The role of perceived speaker attitude in vicarious dissonance. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 7 3: 207-220. doi:10.1177/1368430204046108


Author Monin, Benoft
Norton, Michael I.
Cooper, Joel
Hogg, Michael A.
Title Reacting to an assumed situation vs. conforming to an assumed reaction: The role of perceived speaker attitude in vicarious dissonance
Journal name Group Processes & Intergroup Relations   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1368-4302
Publication date 2004-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1368430204046108
Volume 7
Issue 3
Start page 207
End page 220
Total pages 14
Editor D. Abrams
M. Hogg
Place of publication London, England
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
380105 Social and Community Psychology
780108 Behavioural and cognitive sciences
Abstract Witnessing an ingroup member acting against his or her belief can lead individuals who identify with that group to change their own attitude in the direction of that counterattitudinal behavior. Two studies demonstrate this vicarious dissonance effect among high ingroup identifiers and show that this attitude change is not attributable to conformity to a perceived change in speaker attitude. Study I shows that the effect occurs-indeed, is stronger-even when it is clear that the speaker disagrees with the position espoused, and Study 2 shows that foreseeable aversive consequences bring about attitude change in the observer without any parallel impact on the perceived attitude of the speaker. Furthermore, the assumption that vicarious dissonance is at heart a group phenomenon is supported by the results indicating that attitude change is not impacted either by individual differences in dispositional empathy or measures of interpersonal affinity.
Keyword Psychology, Social
Cognitive Dissonance
Conformity
Vicarious Processes
Cognitive-dissonance
Consequences
Arousal
Bias
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2005 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 04:59:46 EST