Sleepiness, sleep-disordered breathing, and accident risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers

Howard, ME, Desai, AV, Grunstein, RR, Hukins, C, Armstrong, JG, Joffe, D, Swann, P, Campbell, DA and Pierce, RJ (2004) Sleepiness, sleep-disordered breathing, and accident risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers. American Journal of Respiratory And Critical Care Medicine, 170 9: 1014-1021. doi:10.1164/rccm.200312-1782oc


Author Howard, ME
Desai, AV
Grunstein, RR
Hukins, C
Armstrong, JG
Joffe, D
Swann, P
Campbell, DA
Pierce, RJ
Title Sleepiness, sleep-disordered breathing, and accident risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers
Journal name American Journal of Respiratory And Critical Care Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1073-449X
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1164/rccm.200312-1782oc
Volume 170
Issue 9
Start page 1014
End page 1021
Total pages 8
Editor M. J. Tobin
C. Shepherd
Place of publication USA
Publisher American Thoracic Society
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
321027 Respiratory Diseases
730110 Respiratory system and diseases (incl. asthma)
Abstract Sleep-disordered breathing and excessive sleepiness may be more common in commercial vehicle drivers than in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and accidents in this population remains unclear. We measured the prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing and assessed accident risk factors in 2,342 respondents to a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 3,268 Australian commercial vehicle drivers and another 161 drivers among 244 invited to undergo polysomnography. More than half (59.6%) of drivers had sleep-disordered breathing and 15.8% had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Twenty-four percent of drivers had excessive sleepiness. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased accident risk. The sleepiest 5% of drivers on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire had an in-creased risk of an accident (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, p = 0.02 and OR 2.23, p < 0.01, respectively) and multiple accidents (OR 2.67, p < 0.01 and OR 2.39, p = 0.01), adjusted for established risk factors. There was an increased accident risk with narcotic analgesic use (OR 2.40, p < 0.01) and antihistamine use (OR 3.44, p = 0.04). Chronic excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing are common in Australian commercial vehicle drivers. Accident risk was related to increasing chronic sleepiness and antihistamine and narcotic analgesic use.
Keyword Critical Care Medicine
Respiratory System
Accidents
Traffic
Antihistamines
Narcotic Analgesics
Obesity
Haul Truck Drivers
Traffic Accidents
Automobile Accidents
Daytime Sleepiness
Apnea Syndrome
Road Crashes
Nasal Cpap
Adults
Transport
Alcohol
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2005 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 04:57:22 EST