Partitioning of respiration between the gills and air-breathing organ in response to aquatic hypoxia and exercise in the Pacific tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides

Seymour, R. S., Christian, K., Bennett, M. B., Baldwin, J., Wells, R. M. G. and Baudinette, R. V. (2004) Partitioning of respiration between the gills and air-breathing organ in response to aquatic hypoxia and exercise in the Pacific tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, 77 5: 760-767. doi:10.1086/422056

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Author Seymour, R. S.
Christian, K.
Bennett, M. B.
Baldwin, J.
Wells, R. M. G.
Baudinette, R. V.
Title Partitioning of respiration between the gills and air-breathing organ in response to aquatic hypoxia and exercise in the Pacific tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides
Journal name Physiological and Biochemical Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1522-2152
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/422056
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 77
Issue 5
Start page 760
End page 767
Total pages 8
Editor J.W. Hicks
Place of publication Chicago, USA
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
270604 Comparative Physiology
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract The evolution of air-breathing organs (ABOs) is associated not only with hypoxic environments but also with activity. This investigation examines the effects of hypoxia and exercise on the partitioning of aquatic and aerial oxygen uptake in the Pacific tarpon. The two-species cosmopolitan genus Megalops is unique among teleosts in using swim bladder ABOs in the pelagic marine environment. Small fish ( 58 - 620 g) were swum at two sustainable speeds in a circulating flume respirometer in which dissolved oxygen was controlled. For fish swimming at 0.11 m s(-1) in normoxia (Po-2 = 21 kPa), there was practically no air breathing, and gill oxygen uptake was 1.53 mL kg(-0.67) min(-1). Air breathing occurred at 0.5 breaths min(-1) in hypoxia ( 8 kPa) at this speed, when the gills and ABOs accounted for 0.71 and 0.57 mL kg(-0.67) min(-1), respectively. At 0.22 m s(-1) in normoxia, breathing occurred at 0.1 breaths min(-1), and gill and ABO oxygen uptake were 2.08 and 0.08 mL kg(-0.67) min(-1), respectively. In hypoxia and 0.22 m s(-1), breathing increased to 0.6 breaths min(-1), and gill and ABO oxygen uptake were 1.39 and 1.28 mL kg(-0.67) min(-1), respectively. Aquatic hypoxia was therefore the primary stimulus for air breathing under the limited conditions of this study, but exercise augmented oxygen uptake by the ABOs, particularly in hypoxic water.
Keyword Physiology
Zoology
Amia-calva
Amphibious Fish
Oxygen
Temperature
Ventilation
Atlanticus
Water
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 04:50:11 EST