Aspects of adaptive management of coastal wetlands: Case studies of processes, conservation, restoration, impacts and assessment

Dale, Pat E. R., Dale, Mike B., Anorov, Julie, Knight, Jon M., Minno, Mark C., Powell, Bernie, Raynie, Richard C. and Visser, Jenneke M. (2006). Aspects of adaptive management of coastal wetlands: Case studies of processes, conservation, restoration, impacts and assessment. In J. T. A. Verhoeven, B. Beltman, R. Bobbink and D. F. Whigham (Ed.), Wetlands: Functioning, biodiversity conservation and restoration (pp. 197-222) Berlin: Springer.


Author Dale, Pat E. R.
Dale, Mike B.
Anorov, Julie
Knight, Jon M.
Minno, Mark C.
Powell, Bernie
Raynie, Richard C.
Visser, Jenneke M.
Title of chapter Aspects of adaptive management of coastal wetlands: Case studies of processes, conservation, restoration, impacts and assessment
Title of book Wetlands: Functioning, biodiversity conservation and restoration
Place of Publication Berlin
Publisher Springer
Publication Year 2006
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-540-33189-6_9
ISBN 978-3-540-33188-9
Editor J. T. A. Verhoeven
B. Beltman
R. Bobbink
D. F. Whigham
Volume number 191
Chapter number 9
Start page 197
End page 222
Total pages 26
Total chapters 13
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subjects 300801 Environmental Management and Rehabilitation
770406 Integrated (ecosystem) assessment and management
B1
0502 Environmental Science and Management
1299 Other Built Environment and Design
Abstract/Summary Coastal wetlands are dynamic and include the freshwater-intertidal interface. In many parts of the world such wetlands are under pressure from increasing human populations and from predicted sea-level rise. Their complexity and the limited knowledge of processes operating in these systems combine to make them a management challenge.Adaptive management is advocated for complex ecosystem management (Hackney 2000; Meretsky et al. 2000; Thom 2000;National Research Council 2003).Adaptive management identifies management aims,makes an inventory/environmental assessment,plans management actions, implements these, assesses outcomes, and provides feedback to iterate the process (Holling 1978;Walters and Holling 1990). This allows for a dynamic management system that is responsive to change. In the area of wetland management recent adaptive approaches are exemplified by Natuhara et al. (2004) for wild bird management, Bunch and Dudycha (2004) for a river system, Thom (2000) for restoration, and Quinn and Hanna (2003) for seasonal wetlands in California. There are many wetland habitats for which we currently have only rudimentary knowledge (Hackney 2000), emphasizing the need for good information as a prerequisite for effective management. The management framework must also provide a way to incorporate the best available science into management decisions and to use management outcomes as opportunities to improve scientific understanding and provide feedback to the decision system. Figure 9.1 shows a model developed by Anorov (2004) based on the process-response model of Maltby et al. (1994) that forms a framework for the science that underlies an adaptive management system in the wetland context.
Keyword Conservation
wetlands ecology
Q-Index Code B1

 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 12:53:48 EST