Country of birth, country of residence, and menopausal transitions and symptoms: British birth cohort and Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

Lee, C., Mishra, G. and Kuh, D. (2004) Country of birth, country of residence, and menopausal transitions and symptoms: British birth cohort and Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 28 2: 144-151. doi:10.1111/j.1467-842X.2004.tb00928.x


Author Lee, C.
Mishra, G.
Kuh, D.
Title Country of birth, country of residence, and menopausal transitions and symptoms: British birth cohort and Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2004.tb00928.x
Volume 28
Issue 2
Start page 144
End page 151
Total pages 8
Editor AsPr J. Daley
Prof J. Lumley
Place of publication Melbourne
Publisher Public Health Association of Australia
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
380107 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
780108 Behavioural and cognitive sciences
Abstract Objective: To explore endocrine-related and general symptoms among three groups of middle-aged women defined by country of birth and country of residence, in the context of debates about biological, cultural and other factors in menopause. Methods: British-born women participating in a British birth cohort study (n=1,362) and age-matched Australian-born (n=1,724) and British-born (n=233) Australian women selected from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) responded to two waves of surveys at ages 48 and 50. Results: Australian-Australian and British-Australian women report reaching menopause later than British-British women, even after accounting for smoking status and parity. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use was lower and hysterectomy was more common among both Australian groups, probably reflecting differences in health services between Britain and Australia. The Australian-Australian and British-Australian groups were more likely to report endocrine-related symptoms than the British-British group, even after adjusting for menopausal status. British-British women were more likely to report some general symptoms. Conclusions: Symptom reporting is high among Australian and British midlife women and varies by country of residence, country of birth and menopausal status. Implications: The data do not support either a simple cultural or a simple biological explanation for differences in menopause experience.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Population
Life
Hysterectomy
Midlife
Age
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 04:14:50 EST