Gender, age and educational attainment differences in Australian adults participation in vigorous sporting and fitness activities

Leslie, E. R., Cerin, E., Gore, C. J., St George, A., Bauman, A. and Owen, N. G. (2004) Gender, age and educational attainment differences in Australian adults participation in vigorous sporting and fitness activities. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 1 4: 377-388.


Author Leslie, E. R.
Cerin, E.
Gore, C. J.
St George, A.
Bauman, A.
Owen, N. G.
Title Gender, age and educational attainment differences in Australian adults participation in vigorous sporting and fitness activities
Journal name Journal of Physical Activity and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 1
Issue 4
Start page 377
End page 388
Total pages 12
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Human Kinetics Publishers
Collection year 2004
Subject C1
321299 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
730299 Public health not elsewhere classified
Formatted abstract
Background: Participation in regular vigorous physical activity could confer health benefits additional to those derived from moderate-intensity physical activities that are currently the focus of public health strategies.

Methods: Sociodemographic differences in reported participation in vigorous sporting and fitness activities over the past 2 weeks were examined using cross-sectional data from an Australian urban population sample.

Results: Participation at least once in any form of vigorous physical activity and regular participation (six or more sessions) both decreased across successive age groups and from high to low levels of education. The most frequently reported types of vigorous physical activity were cycling (13.3%), jogging (10.1%), swimming (8.4%) for men; and, swimming (8.9%), cycling (8.8%) and aerobics (8.6%) for women.

Conclusion: Rates of regular participation in vigorous activities were low. Interventions might focus on ways to encourage younger adults to engage more regularly in these activities and to maintain participation through the lifespan.
Q-Index Code C1

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 04:05:48 EST