A commentary on the impacts of metals and metalloids in the environment upon the metabolism of drugs and chemicals

Moore, Michael R. (2004) A commentary on the impacts of metals and metalloids in the environment upon the metabolism of drugs and chemicals. Toxicology Letters, 148 3: 153-158.


Author Moore, Michael R.
Title A commentary on the impacts of metals and metalloids in the environment upon the metabolism of drugs and chemicals
Journal name Toxicology Letters   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-4274
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.toxlet.2003.10.027
Volume 148
Issue 3
Start page 153
End page 158
Total pages 6
Place of publication Clare, Ireland
Publisher Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
321299 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
730299 Public health not elsewhere classified
Abstract The salient feature of metals is that unlike organic compounds they do not degrade in the environment and barely move from one environmental matrix to another. Human interventions take these compounds from their stable and non-bioavailable geological matrix into situations of biological accessibility. Studies in the 1970s and the 1980s of metal bioavailability and impacts of metals and metalloids were driven by the process of abatement of lead in the environment. Humans have clear and identifiable sources of exposure from fuels, food and leaded water pipes to lead. Interventions started at that time have dramatically lowered human lead exposure. Attention has now shifted to other metals, in particular, cadmium, which has seen increasing use. It is generally accepted that food crops grown on cadmium containing soils or soils naturally rich in this metal are the major source of exposure to humans other than exposure from smoking of cigarettes. This mini-review gives a summary and commentary on early studies on effects of lead on haem metabolism that provide us the clue to why investigations of the impacts of other toxic heavy metals and metalloids such as cadmium and arsenic on different human cytochrome P450 forms have become of great interest at the current time. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Toxicology
Lead
Cadmium
Mercury
Arsenic
Haem Oxygenase
Ala Synthase
Cytochrome P450 Enzymes
Drug Metabolism
Xenochemicals
Heme Oxygenase
Rat-liver
Cytochrome-p-450 System
Arsenic Carcinogenesis
Lead-intoxication
Cadmium Exposure
Gene-expression
Kidney Cortex
Induction
Q-Index Code C1

 
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