A case study of the resolution of paediatric dysphagia following brainstern injury: clinical and instrumental assessment

Morgan, A., Ward, E. and Murdoch, B. (2004) A case study of the resolution of paediatric dysphagia following brainstern injury: clinical and instrumental assessment. Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, 11 2: 182-190. doi:10.1016/S0967-5868(03)00195-4


Author Morgan, A.
Ward, E.
Murdoch, B.
Title A case study of the resolution of paediatric dysphagia following brainstern injury: clinical and instrumental assessment
Journal name Journal of Clinical Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0967-5868
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0967-5868(03)00195-4
Volume 11
Issue 2
Start page 182
End page 190
Total pages 9
Editor A.H. Kaye
Place of publication UK
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
321025 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Hearing and Speech
730111 Hearing, vision, speech and their disorders
Abstract The coexistance of a swallowing impairment can severely impact upon the medical condition and recovery of a child with traumatic brain injury [ref.(1): Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation 9 (1) (1994) 43]. Limited data exist on the progression or outcome of dysphagia in the paediatric population with brainstem injury. The present prospective study documents the resolution of dysphagia in a 14-year-old female post-brainstem injury using clinical, radiological and endoscopic evaluations of swallowing. The subject presented with a pattern of severe oral-motor and oropharyngeal swallowing impairment post-injury that resolved rapidly for the initial 12 weeks, slowed to gradual progress for weeks 12-20, and then plateaued at 20 weeks post-injury. Whilst a clinically functional swallow was present at 10 months post-injury, radiological examination revealed a number of residual physiological impairments, reduced swallowing efficiency, and reduced independence for feeding, indicating a potential increased risk for aspiration. The data highlight the need for early and continued evaluation and intensive treatment programs, to focus on the underlying physiological swallowing impairment post-brainstem injury, and to help offset any potential deleterious effects of aspiration that may affect patient recovery, such as pneumonia. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Clinical Neurology
Neurosciences
Stem Stroke
Swallowing Disorders
Risk-factors
Rehabilitation
Pneumonia
Secondary
Children
Scale
Q-Index Code C1

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 307 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 03:37:47 EST