The 'muscle-bone unit' during the pubertal growth spurt

Rauch, Frank, Bailey, Donald A., Baxter-Jones, Adam, Mirwald, Robert and Faulkner, Robert (2004) The 'muscle-bone unit' during the pubertal growth spurt. Bone, 34 5: 771-775. doi:10.1016/j.bone.2004.01.022


Author Rauch, Frank
Bailey, Donald A.
Baxter-Jones, Adam
Mirwald, Robert
Faulkner, Robert
Title The 'muscle-bone unit' during the pubertal growth spurt
Journal name Bone   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 8756-3282
Publication date 2004-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.bone.2004.01.022
Volume 34
Issue 5
Start page 771
End page 775
Total pages 5
Editor R. Baron
Place of publication New York
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
321017 Orthopaedics
321019 Paediatrics
730114 Skeletal system and disorders (incl. arthritis)
Abstract Mechanostat theory postulates that developmental changes in bone strength are secondary to the increasing loads imposed by larger muscle forces. Therefore, the increase in muscle strength should precede the increase in bone strength. We tested this prediction using densitometric surrogate measures of muscle force (lean body mass, LBM) and bone strength (bone mineral content, BMC) in a study on 70 boys and 68 girls who were longitudinally examined during pubertal development. On the level of the total body, the peak in LBM accrual preceded the peak in BMC accretion by an average of 0.51 years in girls and by 0.36 years in boys. In the arms, the maximal increase in LBM was followed by arm peak BMC accrual after an interval of 0.71 years in girls and 0.63 years in boys. In the lower extremities, the maximal increase in LBM was followed by peak BMC accrual after an interval of 0.22 years in girls and 0.48 years in boys. A multiple regression model revealed that total body peak LBM velocity, but not peak height velocity and sex, was independently associated with total body peak BMC velocity (r(2) = 0.50; P < 0.001). Similarly, arm and leg peak LBM velocity, but not peak height velocity and sex, were independently associated with arm and leg peak BMC velocity, respectively (r(2) = 0.61 for arms, r(2) = 0.41 for legs; P < 0.001 in both cases). These results are compatible with the view that bone development is driven by muscle development, although the data do not exclude the hypothesis that the two processes are independently determined by genetic mechanisms. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keyword Endocrinology & Metabolism
Bone Mass
Growth
Lean Body Mass
Muscle Mass
Puberty
Mineral Density
Mass
Children
Adolescents
Girls
Strength
Boys
Age
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 03:23:32 EST