An investigation into effects of long-distance seed dispersal on organelle population genetic structure and colonization rate: a model analysis

Davies, S., White, A. and Lowe, A. (2004) An investigation into effects of long-distance seed dispersal on organelle population genetic structure and colonization rate: a model analysis. Heredity, 93 6: 566-576.


Author Davies, S.
White, A.
Lowe, A.
Title An investigation into effects of long-distance seed dispersal on organelle population genetic structure and colonization rate: a model analysis
Journal name Heredity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0018-067X
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/sj.hdy.6800555
Volume 93
Issue 6
Start page 566
End page 576
Total pages 11
Editor R. Nichols
Place of publication UK
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
270203 Population and Ecological Genetics
770706 Remnant vegetation and protected conservation areas
Abstract A simulation-based modelling approach is used to examine the effects of stratified seed dispersal (representing the distribution of the majority of dispersal around the maternal parent and also rare long-distance dispersal) on the genetic structure of maternally inherited genomes and the colonization rate of expanding plant populations. The model is parameterized to approximate postglacial oak colonization in the UK, but is relevant to plant populations that exhibit stratified seed dispersal. The modelling approach considers the colonization of individual plants over a large area (three 500 km x 10 km rolled transects are used to approximate a 500 km x 300 km area). Our approach shows how the interaction of plant population dynamics with stratified dispersal can result in a spatially patchy haplotype structure. We show that while both colonization speeds and the resulting genetic structure are influenced by the characteristics of the dispersal kernel, they are robust to changes in the periodicity of long-distance events, provided the average number of long-distance dispersal events remains constant. We also consider the effects of additional physical and environmental mechanisms on plant colonization. Results show significant changes in genetic structure when the initial colonization of different haplotypes is staggered over time and when a barrier to colonization is introduced. Environmental influences on survivorship and fecundity affect both the genetic structure and the speed of colonization. The importance of these mechanisms in relation to the postglacial spread and genetic structure of oak in the UK is discussed.
Keyword Genetics & Heredity
Colonization
Seed Dispersal
Population Structure
Quercus
Chloroplast Dna Variation
Plant Migration Rates
European White Oaks
Postglacial Colonization
Patterns
Diversity
Phylogeography
Consequences
Reproduction
Simulation
Q-Index Code C1

 
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