A longitudinal study of employee adaptation to organizational change: The role of change-related information and change-related self-efficacy

Jimmieson, Nerina L., Terry, Deborah J. and Callan, Victor J. (2004) A longitudinal study of employee adaptation to organizational change: The role of change-related information and change-related self-efficacy. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 9 1: 11-27. doi:10.1037/1076-8998.9.1.11

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Author Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Terry, Deborah J.
Callan, Victor J.
Title A longitudinal study of employee adaptation to organizational change: The role of change-related information and change-related self-efficacy
Journal name Journal of Occupational Health Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1076-8998
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/1076-8998.9.1.11
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 9
Issue 1
Start page 11
End page 27
Total pages 17
Editor J. Barling
Place of publication Washington
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
350200 Business and Management
720403 Management
Abstract This study examined the role of information, efficacy, and 3 stressors in predicting adjustment to organizational change. Participants were 589 government employees undergoing an 18-month process of regionalization. To examine if the predictor variables had long-term effects on adjustment, the authors assessed psychological well-being, client engagement, and job satisfaction again at a 2-year follow-up. At Time 1, there was evidence to suggest that information was indirectly related to psychological well-being, client engagement, and job satisfaction, via its positive relationship to efficacy. There also was evidence to suggest that efficacy was related to reduced stress appraisals, thereby heightening client engagement. Last, there was consistent support for the stress-buffering role of Time I self-efficacy in the prediction of Time 2 job satisfaction.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Psychology, Applied
Negative Affectivity
Method Variance
Multiple-regression
Coping Strategies
Reported Affect
Mental-health
Job Stress
Work
Impact
Uncertainty
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes This is an author version of an article originally published as: Jimmieson, N. L., Terry, D. J. and Callan, V. J. (2004) A longitudinal study of employee adaptation to organizational change: The role of change-related information and change-related self-efficacy. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 9 1: 11-27. doi:10.1037/1076-8998.9.1.11 Copyright 2004 American Psychological Association. All rights reserved.

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 03:15:46 EST