The efficacy of a specific balance-strategy training programme for preventing falls among older people: A pilot randomised controlled trial

Nitz, Jennifer C. and Low Choy, Nancy (2004) The efficacy of a specific balance-strategy training programme for preventing falls among older people: A pilot randomised controlled trial. Age and Ageing, 33 1: 52-58. doi:10.1093/ageing/afh029


Author Nitz, Jennifer C.
Low Choy, Nancy
Title The efficacy of a specific balance-strategy training programme for preventing falls among older people: A pilot randomised controlled trial
Journal name Age and Ageing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-0729
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ageing/afh029
Volume 33
Issue 1
Start page 52
End page 58
Total pages 7
Editor G. Wilcock
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730303 Occupational, speech and physiotherapy
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy)
111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
Formatted abstract
 Background: older people participate in exercise programmes to reduce the risk of falls but no study has investigated a specific balance strategy training intervention presented in a workstation format for small groups.

Objective: to determine whether a specific balance strategy training programmeme delivered in a workstation format was superior to a community based exercise class programme for reducing falls.

Design: a randomised controlled trial model.

Setting: Neurological Disorders, Ageing and Balance Clinic, Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Queensland.

Subjects: 73 males and females over 60 years, living independently in the community and who had fallen in the previous year were recruited.

Methods: all subjects received a falls risk education booklet and completed an incident calendar for the duration of the study. Treatment sessions were once a week for 10 weeks. Subject assessment before and after intervention and at 3 months follow-up included number of falls, co-morbidities, medications, community services and activity level, functional motor ability, clinical and laboratory balance measures and fear of falling.

Results: all participants significantly reduced the number of falls (P < 0.000). The specific balance strategy intervention group showed significantly more improvement in functional measures than the control group (P = 0.034). Separate group analyses indicated significantly improved performance in functional motor ability and most clinical balance measures for the balance group (P < 0.04). The control group only improved in TUG and TUGcog.

Conclusions: the results provide evidence that all participants achieved a significant reduction in falls. Specific balance strategy training using workstations is superior to traditional exercise classes for improving function and balance.

Keyword Geriatrics & Gerontology
Randomised Controlled Trial
Falls
Balance
Functional Ability
Exercise
Workstations
Elderly
Mobility
Adults
Exercise
Stability
Risk
Go
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 03:12:05 EST