Improving the physical status and quality of life of women treated for breast cancer: A pilot study of a structured exercise intervention

Turner, J., Hayes, S. and Reul-Hirche, H. (2004) Improving the physical status and quality of life of women treated for breast cancer: A pilot study of a structured exercise intervention. Journal of Surgical Oncology, 86 3: 141-146. doi:10.1002/jso.20065


Author Turner, J.
Hayes, S.
Reul-Hirche, H.
Title Improving the physical status and quality of life of women treated for breast cancer: A pilot study of a structured exercise intervention
Journal name Journal of Surgical Oncology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-4790
1096-9098
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/jso.20065
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 86
Issue 3
Start page 141
End page 146
Total pages 6
Editor Haller, D. G.
Place of publication Virginia, U.S.A.
Publisher American Society of Surgical Oncology
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
321021 Psychiatry
730211 Mental health
Abstract Background and Objectives: This pilot project assessed the acceptability of a mixed-type, moderate-intensity exercise programme following breast cancer treatment, and the impact on presence of lymphoedema, fitness, body composition, fatigue, mood and quality of life. Methods: Ten women completed the programme and measures of fitness (submaximal ergometer test), body composition (bio-electrical impedance), lympoedema (bio-electrical impedance and arm circumferences), fatigue (revised Piper Fatigue Scale), mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (FACT-B) and general well-being, at baseline, completion of the programme, and 6-week and 3-month follow-up. Results: Participation in the programme caused no adverse effect on the presence of lymphoedema. There was a trend towards reduction in fatigue and improved quality of life across the testing phases. Women rated the programme extremely favourably, citing benefits of the support of other women, trained guidance, and the opportunity to experience different types of exercise. Conclusions: A mixed-type, moderate-intensity exercise program in a group format is acceptable to women following breast cancer treatment, with the potential to reduce fatigue and improve quality of life, without exacerbating or precipitating lymphoedema. This pilot work needs to be confirmed in larger randomised studies. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Keyword Oncology
Surgery
Breast Cancer
Exercise
Well-being
Randomized Controlled-trial
Chemotherapy
Outcomes
Fatigue
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2005 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 13:11:06 EST