Demographic and clinical correlates of comorbid substance use disorders in psychosis: multivariate analyses from an epidemiological sample

Kavanagh, David J., Waghorn, Geoffrey, Jenner, Linda, Chant, David C., Carr, Vaughan, Evans, Mandy, Herrman, Helen, Jablensky, Assen and McGrath, John J. (2004) Demographic and clinical correlates of comorbid substance use disorders in psychosis: multivariate analyses from an epidemiological sample. Schizophrenia Research, 66 2-3: 115-124. doi:10.1016/S0920-9964(03)00130-0


Author Kavanagh, David J.
Waghorn, Geoffrey
Jenner, Linda
Chant, David C.
Carr, Vaughan
Evans, Mandy
Herrman, Helen
Jablensky, Assen
McGrath, John J.
Title Demographic and clinical correlates of comorbid substance use disorders in psychosis: multivariate analyses from an epidemiological sample
Journal name Schizophrenia Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0920-9964
Publication date 2004-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0920-9964(03)00130-0
Volume 66
Issue 2-3
Start page 115
End page 124
Total pages 10
Editor H.A. Nasrallah
L.E. Delisi
Place of publication Amsterdam
Publisher Elsevier BV
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
321021 Psychiatry
730211 Mental health
Formatted abstract
Background:
While there has been substantial research examining the correlates of comorbid substance abuse in psychotic disorders, it has been difficult to tease apart the relative importance of individual variables. Multivariate analyses are required, in which the relative contributions of risk factors to specific forms of substance misuse are examined, while taking into account the effects of other important correlates.

Methods:

This study used multivariate correlates of several forms of comorbid substance misuse in a large epidemiological sample of 852 Australians with DSM-III-R-diagnosed psychoses.

Results:

Multiple substance use was common and equally prevalent in nonaffective and affective psychoses. The most consistent correlate across the substance use disorders was male sex. Younger age groups were more likely to report the use of illegal drugs, while alcohol misuse was not associated with age. Side effects secondary to medication were associated with the misuse of cannabis and multiple substances, but not alcohol. Lower educational attainment was associated with cannabis misuse but not other forms of substance abuse.

Conclusion:
The profile of substance misuse in psychosis shows clinical and demographic gradients that can inform treatment and preventive research. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keyword Psychosis
Schizophrenia
Epidemiology
Substance Abuse
Substance Dependence
Antisocial Personality-disorder
Positive-negative Dichotomy
Drug-use Disorders
Conduct Disorder
National-survey
Mental-health
Abuse
Alcohol
Prevalence
Psychiatry
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 100 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 13:10:55 EST